The News – 27 June 2014

Overview

  • The Federal Government has cut the dementia and severe behaviours supplement, paid to providers of care for people with severe behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.
  • Action Needed To Protect Kids From Alcohol Ads.The second annual report of the Alcohol Advertising Review Board [AARB] was launched today THIS WEEK at Parliament House in Canberra by AMA Federal Vice President Dr Stephen Parnis.
  • Ten percent of us are on a gluten-free diet but the research says unless you are coeliac, there is no link between gut disorders and gluten.


Stories Discussed
News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 27th June 2014. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-26/dementia-supplement-payment-cut-after-budget-blow-out/5553394

The Federal Government has cut the dementia and severe behaviours supplement, paid to providers of care for people with severe behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.

Assistant Minister for Social Services Mitch Fifield has told the Senate the Government had no choice but to eliminate the supplement as of July 31, after its budget blew out by nearly 10 times over.

The dementia and severe behaviours supplement is only a year old. It provides a payment of $16 a day for each eligible dementia patient in residential care homes.

Figures released by the Department of Social Services show demand for the payment has dramatically outstripped initial projections.

Original estimates indicated 2,000 people in residential care would be eligible. Instead, as of March, more than 25,000 people were receiving the supplement.

The budget for the payment expanded accordingly, from an initial estimate of $11.7 million to $110 million this year.

The peak body for not-for-profit residential care, Aged and Community Services Australia, says the number of those applying for the supplement should not have been a surprise.

…CEO John Kelly said…

He says losing the supplement will impact care.

https://ama.com.au/media/action-needed-protect-kids-alcohol-ads

ACTION NEEDED TO PROTECT KIDS FROM ALCOHOL ADS

The second annual report of the Alcohol Advertising Review Board [AARB] was launched today THIS WEEK at Parliament House in Canberra by AMA Federal Vice President Dr Stephen Parnis. The report provides further evidence that self-regulation of alcohol advertising is ineffective and many alcohol companies are ignoring concerns about young people’s exposure to ads through sport, TV and online.

The AARB was established by the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth and the Cancer Council Western Australia with support from many health organisations. The Board is chaired by leading child health researcher, Professor Fiona Stanley AC.

In its second year, the AARB received 209 complaints. There were 86 determinations that upheld complaints in full and 44 in part. The 209 complaints are again more than the number received by the industry’s self-regulatory system.

Dr Parnis said, “Children are being heavily exposed to alcohol promotion, often in association with their sporting idols. The government should act now to introduce strong regulatory controls on the content, placement and volume of alcohol advertising and promotion”.

The report lists the “Top 10 alcohol advertising shockers of 2013-14”. These include examples of exposure to young people through sponsorship of major sports, a Carlton Draught AFL Tipping email sent to children; AND outdoor ads placed near a school and youth centre; …

Dr Parnis said, “The actions of alcohol advertisers have consistently shown that they have little interest in addressing this issue. We call on the government to act immediately to close the loophole that allows alcohol ads during live sport on TV, end alcohol sponsorship of sport and bring in legislated controls to cover all alcohol marketing activities.”

The report was launched as part of a forum organised by the National Alliance for Action on Alcohol – “Recruiting New Drinkers – the Impact of Alcohol Marketing on Children”.

The report of the AARB is available at www.alcoholadreview.com.au

Copies of the report are being sent to all Health Ministers and Federal Members of Parliament.

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2014/06/25/4033150.htm

Ten percent of us are on a gluten-free diet but the research says unless you are coeliac, there is no link between gut disorders and gluten.

Gluten is a protein found in some grains like wheat, barley and rye. It can cause inflammation in the small intestine of people with celiac disease.

For these people, the availability of gluten-free foods is a lifeline that allows some semblance of normality; …

Sufferers of coeliac disease comprise about one percent of the population, yet around ten percent of us follow a gluten-free diet. As a result the supermarket shelves are bulging with an ever-increasing range of gluten-free products. …

An article in the Wall Street Journal this week pulled apart the gluten-free craze, highlighting its place as the latest “bete-noir” of wellbeing; the way food producers have cashed in on the fad and the failure of researchers to prove any connection between gluten and poor gut health.

Professor Peter Gibson, director of Gastroenterology at The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, told the Australian Food Science and Technology conference that a blind study he conducted recently couldn’t find a link between gluten and the complaints suffered by the participants.

Professor Gibson went so far as to say there could be negative health effects for those who go gluten-free of their own accord, suggesting outcomes such as nutritional deficiencies, mental health problems and an increased consumption of sugar. He said people who experienced an improvement in health from going gluten-free were probably benefitting from a reduction in carbohydrates in their diet.

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