The News – 31 July 2014

Overview

  • An ACT man who was providing liquid medical cannabis to the family of a seriously ill toddler has had his house raided by police, after writing to the Chief Minister to tell her the treatment was working.
  • The Voluntary Euthanasia Party’s South Australian Senate candidate Max Bromson at last year’s election has died in an Adelaide motel room after taking the lethal drug Nembutal.
  • Australian researchers infecting ferrets to understand the deadly Ebola virus at the CSIRO in Geelong said a vaccine would not come fast enough to stop the current outbreak.


Stories Discussed
News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 31st July 2014. Read by Rebecca Foster.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-30/gallagher-reports-man-who-supplied-cannabis-to-sick-child/5636446

An ACT man who was providing liquid medical cannabis to the family of a seriously ill toddler has had his house raided by police, after writing to the Chief Minister to tell her the treatment was working.

The marijuana was being supplied to (a) family of a two-year-old girl named Abbey, who suffers from seizures that cause brain damage.

Cannabis tincture controls the seizures and keeps her alive, but her supply has now been cut off.

In February the ACT man, who had been giving the cannabis tincture to the child’s mother Cherie, wrote to Katy Gallagher explaining the child’s health was improving.

He also asked whether she would consider legalising medical marijuana.

Two months later the police raided the man’s house.

Ms Gallagher said the man had been corresponding with her for a number of years before he had indicated to her that he had a young child, a patient, who he was administering marijuana to.

Across Australia it is illegal to use cannabis for pain relief, and those who do risk criminal prosecution.

Greens MLA Shane Rattenbury has released draft legislation for consultation and a discussion paper to legalise medical cannabis in the ACT.

The legislation will be put before the ACT Legislative Assembly in the coming months.

Ms Gallagher said she was examining the legislation carefully but the advice she had been given on the topic was mixed.

Ms Gallagher said allowing special access to a drug that was prohibited “across the board” was legally complex and issues of supply and distribution would need to be examined.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-30/euthanasia-advocate-max-bromson-dead-nembutal/5636166

The Voluntary Euthanasia Party’s South Australian Senate candidate at last year’s election has died in an Adelaide motel room after taking the lethal drug Nembutal.

Max Bromson, 66, had been terminally ill with bone cancer.

Euthanasia advocate Philip Nitschke says Mr Bromson bought Chinese Nembutal after joining the Exit International “buyer’s club”.

Mr Bromson drank the drug on Sunday night, surrounded by family.

Mr Bromson had left a note and filmed his own death to prove his family did not assist him.

His phone message left no doubt as to his intentions: “Hello, this is Max Bromson. I am deceased as of July 27, please do not leave a message.”

Dr Nitschke said Mr Bromson’s family informed police on Monday morning of his death and was told an inquest would be held, despite the note and video.

Family members had their mobile phones, tablets and computers seized by police and were told it could be up to two years before they would get them back.

Ms Bromson said it was a waste of police resources.

Dr Nitschke said Mr Bromson was “a person who knew what he wanted”.

The Nembutal used by Mr Bromson was tested for its purity at Dr Nitschke’s Adelaide clinic.

Dr Nitschke’s registration was suspended last week over his involvement with a Perth man, who took his own life but was not terminally ill.

Police will now question him about Mr Bromson.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-30/csiro-researchers-use-ferrets-in-search-for-ebola-cure/5636008

Australian researchers infecting ferrets to understand the deadly Ebola virus at the CSIRO in Geelong said a vaccine would not come fast enough to stop the current outbreak.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), more than 650 people have been killed in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since an outbreak began in February.

The doctor leading Sierra Leone’s fight against Ebola died on Tuesday afternoon (local time) from the virus.

There is no cure for the disease, which causes vomiting, diarrhoea and internal and external bleeding.

Glenn Marsh from the CSIRO’s Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL) said any vaccine or therapy was a long way off.

The research is taking place in a sealed-off section of the AAHL, where nothing gets in or out.

Anyone who enters is required to shower first and wear clothes that are provided on-site.

Dr Marsh said it was the perfect place for researching such a dangerous virus.

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