The Health News United Kingdom August 24 2017

Overview

  • Families could be offered discounts on their food shopping, cut-price sports gear and free cinema tickets for hitting exercise targets in a drive to reduce the burden of lifestyle-related illness on the NHS. The proposals, for residents to receive rewards if they walk a specified number of steps, form part of NHS England’s plans for ten new “healthy towns”, intended to address serious healthcare problems including obesity and dementia.
  • Doctors says that new mothers should not embrace the trend of “seeding” their babies with vaginal bacteria. It exposes children born by C-section to bacteria that could have coated their bodies if they had been born vaginally.
  • More than 100 HIV home-testing kits have been seized by the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency amid fears over their reliability. People are advised to always check before using a HIV kit that it carries a CE mark, which indicates that it complies with EU safety, health and environmental requirements.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 24th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/aug/22/uk-families-money-off-shopping-bills-hit-exercise-goals-nhs

Families could be offered discounts on their food shopping, cut-price sports gear and free cinema tickets for hitting exercise targets in a drive to reduce the burden of lifestyle-related illness on the NHS. The proposals, for residents to receive rewards if they walk a specified number of steps, form part of NHS England’s plans for ten new “healthy towns”, intended to address serious healthcare problems including obesity and dementia. As well as downloadable apps that reward walking, plans for Halton Lea in Runcorn, Cheshire, include free bikes, an outdoor cinema, sprinting tracks on pavements and outdoor gyms. Residents could receive lessons in how to cook healthily, while a community kitchen could supply food to local schools, hospitals and meals on wheels.

Simon Stevens, the chief executive of NHS England, said it was crucial that health should be “designed in” to the much-needed wave of house building across the country. He also states that  the NHS makes no apologies for weighing in with good ideas on how the built environment can encourage healthy towns and supportive neighbourhoods. The healthy towns programme was launched in March last year and includes new developments stretching from Darlington to Devon, comprising more than seventy six thousand homes and one hundred seventy thousand residents. It is hoped they will establish a blueprint that will be followed elsewhere. The initiative is a response to the burden being placed on the NHS by disease linked to sedentary lifestyles. In two thousand fifteen to two thousand sixteen, more than one in five children in reception and more than one in three in year six were obese or overweight. Britain loses more than one hundred thirty million working days to ill health each year, and a Design Council guide estimates that a quarter of British adults walk for fewer than nine minutes a day.


http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41011589

New mothers should not embrace the trend of “seeding” their babies with vaginal bacteria, say doctors. It exposes children born by Caesarean section to bacteria that could have coated their bodies if they had been born vaginally. The idea is bacteria help train the immune system and lower the risk of allergies and asthma. But doctors in Denmark and the UK said there was too little evidence and it may be doing more harm than good. Being born by Caesarean section is linked to a higher risk of some immune-based diseases. And there is growing medical interest in the role of the microbiome – the micro-organisms that call our bodies home – in preventing disease. Seeding involves taking a swab of vaginal fluid and rubbing it into the newborn’s face, skin and eyes. A report, published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, said more than ninety percent of Danish obstetricians had said they had been asked about vaginal seeding.It said there was no evidence of any benefit to seeding as there was only one proper study of the technique and it involved just four babies.

In the UK, about a quarter of babies are born via Caesarean section. Doctor Patrick O’Brien, from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said that there is no robust evidence to suggest that vaginal seeding has any associated benefits.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/aug/22/uk-medicines-agency-seizes-hiv-home-test-kits-over-false-result-risk

More than one hundred HIV home-testing kits have been seized by the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency amid fears over their reliability. The agency believes it has seized all stock of the Hightop HIV/Aids home-test kit from UK suppliers but is warning consumers against purchasing the product online or using it, if already purchased, because of the potential for false results. People are advised to always check before using a HIV kit that it carries a CE mark, which indicates that it complies with EU safety, health and environmental requirements. The Hightop tests, manufactured by Qingdao Hightop Biotech Co Ltd, do not have a valid CE mark, meaning they have not met a number of regulatory requirements concerning test performance, labelling and instructions for use.

MHRA’s director of devices, John Wilkinson, said: “People who buy a self-test kit online or from the high street should know what they are buying is safe and reliable. People must make sure the kit has a CE mark and clearly states that it is intended for home self-testing. Don’t use a test kit if it’s damaged or the seal is broken. The MHRA seized one hundred fourteen of the products in question from two UK-based suppliers and all sales of the tests into the UK market have been stopped by the manufacturer. It says consumers should only buy a self-test kit from a reputable source, such as an online pharmacy registered with MHRA. In the UK online pharmacies must be registered with MHRA and display the European common logo on every page of their website.
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The UK and Europe would not appear to be key markets for Qingdao Hightop Biotech: it states that eighty eight percent of its business is domestic, with its next biggest markets the Middle East or four percent and Africa or two point five. HIV self-testing kits sold and advertised for sale in England, Scotland and Wales must be CE-marked.

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