The Health News Australia November 17 2017

  • A vote on a bill to allow voluntary euthanasia in Nsw is expected to go down to the wire in the state’s Upper House. All MPs have been given a conscience vote on the legislation, which would allow terminally ill patients over the age of 25 to end their own lives with the help of doctors. They must be assessed by a psychologist or psychiatrist and have their decision signed off on by two medical practitioners, including a specialist.
  • A government audit has found that a fatal flu outbreak at a Wangaratta nursing home, where 10 residents died of influenza and two others from respiratory illness, was worsened by serious management failures.  In response, the St. John’s Village nursing home accepted the resignation of its own former acting care services manager and referred him to his professional body for potential sanction.
  • The largest storage bank for human biospecimens in the southern hemisphere has opened in Sydney to provide medical researchers with samples to use in their disease-busting efforts. Using the $12 million NSW Health Statewide Biobank researchers will be able to able to deposit and access samples in -196ºC cryogenic vats and temperature-controlled storage units with a state-of-the-art robotics technology.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 17th of November 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-11-16/vote-on-voluntary-euthanasia-to-be-extremely-tight-in-nsw/9154122

A vote on a bill to allow voluntary euthanasia in New South Wales is expected to go down to the wire in the state’s Upper House. All members of parliament have been given a conscience vote on the legislation, which would allow terminally ill patients over the age of twenty five to end their own lives with the help of doctors. The bill’s backers were boosted by the momentum created by similar laws being sponsored by the Victorian Government, but the ABC understands the NSW Upper House vote is extremely tight. It is likely to be decided by a small number of Members of Parliament who are still wavering, including Deputy Nationals leader Niall Blair.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Opposition Leader Luke Foley have both indicated they will vote against the bill if it reaches the Lower House next week, where it looks likely to face an even more difficult passage. Nationals Member of Parliament Trevor Khan, who introduced the bill to Parliament, said terminally ill people should have the right to control how they die.

Labor’s health spokesman Walt Secord said he would be among those voting against the bill.
On Wednesday a group of palliative care doctors and nurses opposed to the bill came to Parliament to make a last-ditch plea to undecided MPs to vote against the bill.
Under the scheme, proposed patients must be over twenty five years old and expected to die within twelve months. They must be assessed by a psychologist or psychiatrist and have their decision signed off on by two medical practitioners, including a specialist. Close relatives can challenge patient eligibility in the Supreme Court.

https://www.thesenior.com.au/news/ten-flu-deaths-at-nursing-home-amid-serious-management-failure/

A government audit has found that a fatal flu outbreak at a Wangaratta nursing home, where ten residents died of influenza and two others from respiratory illness, was worsened by serious management failures.  In response, the Saint John’s Village nursing home accepted the resignation of its own former acting care services manager and referred him to his professional body for potential sanction. A federal government audit of the Saint John’s Village home, which was ordered after the catastrophic outbreak, has found it took days after infections began in August for management to report the outbreak. By the time they did, sixteen residents and eight staff were already sick.

Three of the ten residents who died were not referred to a doctor when they first started showing symptoms, and others had to wait five days for swabs to be taken, the report by the Aged Care Quality Agency found.

The report, which was ordered by the Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt after people started dying during this winter’s flu season, found that at the time the outbreak was in full swing, fifty eight of the nursing home’s staff were sick, including cleaning staff. Agency and casual staff could not keep up with the workload, but, even so, managers only “attended the home for short periods of time on weekends”.

The government review failed the nursing home on thirteen of the forty four accreditation standards – including clinical care and infection control – which homes must meet to earn federal funding. The finding contradicts assurances given on September one by Victoria’s acting chief health officer, Brett Sutton, who said there were “no systemic issues with this facility in terms of infection control”.

In response to influenza outbreaks in Victorian and Tasmanian nursing homes, Health Minister Greg Hunt made it mandatory for aged care facilities to implement flu vaccination programs for staff. Aged care minister Ken Wyatt said all aged care providers had also been asked to review their infection control practices.

http://www.healthcareit.com.au/article/nsw-opens-high-tech-mega-biobank-store-human-samples-medical-research

The largest storage bank for human biospecimens in the southern hemisphere has opened in Sydney to provide medical researchers with samples to use in their disease-busting efforts. Using the twelve million dollars New South Wales Health Statewide Biobank researchers will be able to able to deposit and access samples in negative one hundred ninety six degrees Celsius cryogenic vats and temperature-controlled storage units with a state-of-the-art robotics technology. The data obtained could revolutionise medicine and speed up the time it takes to get discoveries from laboratories to patients, New South Wales Minister for Health and Medical Research Brad Hazzard said.
….
The Biobank will provide researchers with access to the largest collections of human samples in Australia to help them improve the way medical conditions are detected, diagnosed and treated. Understanding people’s complex genetic makeup and how mutations cause disease is one of the greatest scientific breakthroughs of our time, and biobanks are vital to advances in knowledge. Other features of the facility include a fully automated barcode tracking system for traceability and custody control of samples, links to other health data sets through the Centre for Health Record Linkage, a laboratory information management system and automated DNA extraction.

The opening of the high-tech facility on the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital campus is part of the NSW Government’s one point twenty five billion dollars investment over four years in medical research.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.