The Health News Australia January 23 2018

  • A WA experts says that  Parents should consider setting clear boundaries for their teenager’s mobile phone use — especially at bedtime — to give their child the best start to the new school year. An Australian Psychological Society survey late last year found teenagers spent 3.3 hours a day on social media, with some logging on to their favourite sites as many as 50 times a day. It found almost 80% of Australian teenagers had “high mobile phone involvement” which involves using a phone for no particular purpose or being unable to reduce use.
  • The number of WA children prescribed medication to treat ADHA continues to soar and has reached its highest level since 2004. The Stimulant Regulatory Scheme’s latest report reveals that 8857 children were prescribed drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a 59 percent spike from the 5580 young kids and teenagers on stimulant drugs in 2009 and an 11 per cent jump compared with 2015.
  • A study of more than 500 pregnant women who wanted to have a waterbirth at King Edward Memorial Hospital has found that 40% were unsuccessful. But Curtin University researchers said that in those women who had a waterbirth in the 12 months to June 2016, 80% had normal, uncomplicated births. Reasons for not giving birth in a pool included having a labour which progressed too quickly to be prepared, the need for induced labour, damage to tissue, high blood pressure, breech births and fever.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 23rd of January 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/sleepless-kids-linked-to-night-time-mobile-phone-use-ng-b88718369z

A West Australian expert says that parents should consider setting clear boundaries for their teenager’s mobile phone use — especially at bedtime — to give their child the best start to the new school year.

Former schoolteacher Lynette Vernon, a lead researcher with Murdoch University’s school of psychology and exercise science, said teachers were increasingly dealing with tired students in the classroom. Doctor Vernon’s world-first study as part of her PhD found late-night phone use was directly linked to problems with coping skills, depressed moods, lower self-esteem and aggressiveness in students.

Doctor Vernon said with school holidays winding down, it was an ideal time for parents to discuss with their child how they were using their device and rules they could put in place. She added:  “If they are teenagers in particular it will end up causing a lot of friction. It is best to have a conversation around the table about everyone’s digital media use and think about good habits to get a good night’s sleep as you get back to school.”
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An Australian Psychological Society survey late last year found teenagers spent three point three hours a day on social media, with some logging on to their favourite sites as many as fifty times a day. It found almost eighty per cent of Australian teenagers had “high mobile phone involvement” which involves using a phone for no particular purpose or being unable to reduce use.

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/health/adhd-prescription-drug-use-on-rise-in-children-adults-ng-b88718688z

The number of West Australia children prescribed medication to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder continues to soar and has reached its highest level since two thousand four.

The Stimulant Regulatory Scheme’s latest report reveals that eight thousand eight hundred fifty seven children were prescribed drugs for ADHD, a fifty nine percent spike from the five thousand five hundred eighty young kids and teenagers on stimulant drugs in two thousand nine and an eleven percent jump compared with two thousand fifteen.
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Overall, twenty one thousand eight hundred forty West Australians — adults and children — were prescribed ADHD drugs in two thousand sixteen, a rise of six percent over twelve months and a forty four percent increase over the past twelve years. The number of adults on this medication has sharply increased since two thousand four, going from six thousand three hundred four people more than a decade ago to twelve thousand nine hundred eighty three in two thousand sixteen (a rise of one hundred eight percent in twelve years). Two-thirds of the people prescribed medication in two thousand sixteen were males. Nearly sixty percent were adults. Those prescribed ADHD drugs in two thousand sixteen represented zero point eighty four percent of the West Australia population, compared with zero point sixty four in two thousand eleven.

https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/200-new-mums-opt-for-king-edward-memorial-hospital-waterbirths-ng-b88717385z

A study of more than five hundred pregnant women who wanted to have a waterbirth at King Edward Memorial Hospital has found that forty percent were unsuccessful. But Curtin University researchers said that in those women who had a waterbirth in the twelve months to June two thousand sixteen , eighty percent had normal, uncomplicated births.

Reasons for not giving birth in a pool included having a labour which progressed too quickly to be prepared, the need for induced labour, damage to tissue, high blood pressure, breech births and fever. Most women who underwent labour in a pool gave birth in it, and they were more likely to have given birth before, and their first and second stages of labour were likely to have been shorter. The authors said more research was needed so women could make an informed choice.

There were two hundred water births at KEMH last year, and hundreds more women used water to relieve their pain during labour. The study, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, said the results suggested midwives were picking the right women for waterbirth. Doctor Lucy Lewis, from Curtin’s School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine and KEMH, said not all women who set out to labour or birth in water achieved their aim.
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Doctor Lewis said the low cesarean rate among the women surveyed showed midwives were selecting low-risk pregnancies for water labour or birth.

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