The Health News USA September 28 2017

Overview

  • Despite the well-known risks of using sunbeds, a shocking 10% of Brits still do and one in fifty is actually addicted to them. Research shows many women feel more confident, attractive – and even slimmer – when they’re bronzed. But new research shows that some of us may not just have a psychological addiction to tanning, but a physical one too.
  • One in 100 hundred people is thought to have depersonalisation disorder, but experts are warning it is not included in any GP training. This is the result of a little-known mental-health condition called depersonalisation disorder. It is characterised by a sense of disconnect from the world around you, and your own body, and is believed to start as a defence mechanism – helping people to cope in periods of acute anxiety or trauma by switching off reality.
  • News that sexual harassment in the workplace can cause depression and work absence has hit the headlines after the results of a Danish study were published. Researchers surveyed 7,603 employees from 1,041 organisations in Denmark, and asked them about symptoms of depression and whether they’d been subjected to sexual harassment from colleagues or customers or clients in the past 12 months.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 28th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health/shocking-truth-sunbeds-what-addiction-11234730

 

Despite the well-known risks of using sunbeds, a shocking ten percent of Brits still do and one in fifty is actually addicted to them. We’re not talking about the murky depths of drug addiction here – but the compulsion to top up your tan on a sunbed. Research shows many women feel more confident, attractive – and even slimmer – when they’re bronzed. But new research shows that some of us may not just have a psychological addiction to tanning, but a physical one too.

 

Scientists from Germany and the US have just published a study in the British Journal of Dermatology, which showed that almost twenty percent of indoor tanning users have addictive symptoms, such as urges, cravings or diminished control. And earlier research from the Southwestern Medical Centre at the University of Texas, which examined the brains of tanners who took regular sunbed sessions, found that when UV light from the machines hit their bodies, the parts of their brain associated with reward and addiction lit up. According to research which collected evidence from twenty seven studies, sunbed users have a twenty percent increased risk of melanoma – one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer.

Using sunbeds when you’re young can be particularly damaging. If you use a sunbed for the first time when you’re under thirty five your risk of melanoma increases by almost sixty percent compared to people who have never used sunbeds. The more you use them, the higher the risk – the chance of melanoma increases by one point eight percent for each session. According to Cancer Research UK an estimated eighty six percent of melanomas in the UK (around eleven thousand five hundred cases) every year are linked to too much exposure to sunlight and sunbed use. The World Health Organisation’s International Agency for Research on Cancer lists UV tanning beds in its highest cancer risk category – alongside cigarettes and asbestos.

Some cancer organisations around the world are calling for tanning salons to display health warnings – similar to those required on cigarette packets.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41384979

For people living with depersonalisation disorder the world seems unreal, as if through a haze or fog – or even in two D. One in one hundred people is thought to have the condition, but experts are warning it is not included in any GP training.This is the result of a little-known mental-health condition called depersonalisation disorder. It is characterised by a sense of disconnection from the world around you, and your own body, and is believed to start as a defence mechanism – helping people to cope in periods of acute anxiety or trauma by switching off reality. It can also be triggered by drugs such as cannabis.

Experts say it is as widespread as conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder or OCD and schizophrenia, and it has been a medically recognised disorder for decades. Some patients, if untreated, can have it for their entire lives. Yet few medical professionals have heard of it.

Doctor Elaine Hunter runs the only specialist clinic for depersonalisation disorder in the UK.
The Royal College of General Practitioners said mental health was a “key part” of its “extensive training curriculum”. Areas of training “including complex mental health problems… are being developed,” it added.

The Royal College of Psychiatrists said “we must ensure that knowledge of this condition is improved”. Poor diagnosis rates, however, are only one part of the problem. Another is access to treatment. There is only one specialist clinic in the UK, and it has limited resources – seeing fewer than eighty patents a year, compared with the six hundred fifty thousand people estimated to be living with the condition. Access to the clinic on the NHS requires funding from the local clinical commissioning group, but even with a diagnosis this can take months or even longer.

https://www.nhs.uk/news/mental-health/sexual-harassment-at-work-can-cause-depression/

News that sexual harassment in the workplace can cause depression and work absence has hit the headlines after the results of a Danish study were published. Researchers surveyed seven thousand six hundred three employees from one thousand forty one organisations in Denmark, and asked them about symptoms of depression and whether they’d been subjected to sexual harassment from colleagues or customers or clients in the past twelve months. Overall, four percent of women and zero point three of men reported harassment. People who reported harassment from customers or clients scored two point zero five points higher on a fifty-point depression score than those reporting no harassment. People reporting harassment from colleagues scored two point forty five points higher. The findings generally support the understanding that sexual harassment can have harmful effects on mental health – regardless of who it comes from.

The researchers grouped the responses as harassment from clients or customers, or from others in the workplace like colleagues, supervisors or subordinates. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Major Depression Inventory or MDI, which includes twelve questions that cover the standard diagnostic criteria for depression. The final score ranges from zero to fifty, with a higher score showing more symptoms of depression.The researchers split responses into probable depression or not, using a cut-off of above or below twenty, which was established in prior research. They also asked if there were psychological workplace initiatives, such as health insurance to cover treatment by psychologists, or whether the workplace performed a psychosocial assessment. People working in health or care were most likely to report sexual harassment from clients or customers, rather than colleagues.

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