The Health News Australia October 22 2017

  • WorkSafe headquarters building’s design features won the project an Australian-first pre-certification for two categories in an international program that acknowledges it as one of the nation’s healthiest buildings. Chief executive officer of developer Quintessential Equity, Shane Quinn, said the project’s core and shell and its interiors had received pre-certification from the International WELL Building Institute, which tests buildings worldwide on their health and wellness impacts on their occupants. Mister Quinn said certification was assessed on seven categories — air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind.
  • Twenty five percent of Australian women experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Many of those women suffer severe pain, with the condition significantly impacting their social, emotional and physical well being. Now, new guidelines for doctors will help ensure women have access to the best available treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding.
  • Australian women born today will live longer than their predecessors and live an extra four point two years than Australian men. New figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show Australian female life expectancy has increased to 84.6, putting Australian women sixth in the world for predicted lifespan.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 22nd of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/real-estate/victoria/worksafe-hq-gets-australiafirst-nod-for-health-wellbeing/news-story/8ddc48a08746878188e65b93dc300458

When staff arrive for their first day at Geelong’s new WorkSafe headquarters there won’t be that whiff of stale air. That’s because the air would be purged from the entire building to expel residual gases and potential contaminants from the construction before staff move in. It’s part of the design features that won the project an Australian-first pre-certification for two categories in an international program that acknowledges it as one of the nation’s healthiest buildings.
Chief executive officer of developer Quintessential Equity, Shane Quinn, said the project’s core and shell and its interiors had received pre-certification from the International WELL Building Institute, which tests buildings worldwide on their health and wellness impacts on their occupants. Mister Quinn said certification was assessed on seven categories — air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind.
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Design features include using low toxicity and natural stone and timber finishes, high-grade air filters; quality acoustic performance and soundproofing; water filtration and quality testing and lighting designed to minimise disruption to the body’s circadian rhythm and avoid eyestrain and associated headaches. The building is designed to maximise natural light with views over Corio Bay and Johnstone Park, while multiple outdoor areas, including a rooftop terrace, a cafe offering healthy foods and eating areas on each floor are also provided. Lockers and bike storage encourage active commuting, while sit-stand desks and activity incentive programs will also be offered to staff.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-10-20/medical-guidelines-to-help-women-with-heavy-menstrual-bleeding/9066742

Twenty five percent of Australian women experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Many of those women suffer severe pain, with the condition significantly impacting their social, emotional and physical well being. Now, new guidelines for doctors will help ensure women have access to the best available treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding. Professor Anne Duggan, senior medical advisor at the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, said some women were not being offered the full range of treatments. She added :”Hysterectomy used to be one of the few options for women with heavy menstrual bleeding, but there are now several less invasive treatment options.”

While hysterectomy stops menstrual bleeding, it is a major surgical procedure and is not recommended as a first-line treatment under the new guidelines. Studies show Australia has one of the highest reported rates of hysterectomy in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, with marked differences between regional and metropolitan areas.

The new guidelines recommend women are offered pharmaceutical treatments in the first instance. If pharmaceutical treatments are not effective, an intrauterine hormonal device or IUD may be considered if appropriate. But, if surgical intervention is necessary, endometrial ablation — the removal of the inner lining of the uterus — and other “uterine-preserving alternatives” are encouraged.
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There are many causes of heavy menstrual bleeding, but in about half of cases no cause can be identified. It may be the result of a structural abnormality such as fibroids — non-cancerous growths of muscle tissue that form within the walls of the uterus. Another possible cause is a disorder in the way blood-flow is regulated in the lining of the uterus. Either way, the timing of ultrasounds in screening for heavy menstrual bleeding is crucial to get an accurate diagnosis, the guideline experts said. The scan should be done five to ten days from the first day of a woman’s period… According to the new guidelines, women with heavy menstrual bleeding should be offered easy to understand information about the risks and benefits of the various treatments for heavy menstrual bleeding.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/health/australian-women-living-longer-than-their-predecessors/news-story/9f7be900d2c86ea936376031647216f7

Australian women born today will live longer than their predecessors and live an extra four point two years than Australian men. New figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show Australian female life expectancy has increased to eighty four point six, putting Australian women sixth in the world for predicted lifespan. Women and men living in the Australian Capital Territory recorded the highest life expectancy with men living to eighty one point three years and women reaching eighty five point two years.The Northern Territory had the lowest life expectancy for both sexes with men born now expected to live to seventy five point six years and women expected to reach seventy eight point seven years.

Australia’s male life expectancy remained eighty point four years, placing Aussie men third in global rankings behind Iceland and Switzerland.

Female life expectancy in Australia has increased by thirty three point seven years in the past one hundred and twenty five years to twenty fifteen and male life expectancy has increased by thirty three point two years over the same period. ABS Demography Director Beidar Cho said the increase in predicted lifespan reflected a major shift in causes of death from infectious diseases to chronic diseases. ABS figures show Australia’s combined male and female life expectancy in twenty fourteen to twenty sixteen was eighty two point five years, eleven point seven years higher than the latest available world average of seventy point eight years.

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