The Health News Australia February 6 2018

  • When it comes to breast cancer screening in culturally and linguistically diverse communities (CALD), there are varied and complex reasons that can hinder important messages about early detection. A recent analysis of 5 studies involving more than 1,700 first-generation Chinese, African, Arabic, Korean and Indian-Australian women found just 19% identified as “breast aware”, and only 27% aged 40 or above had participated in annual clinical breast exams.
  • The UNSW research team, led by Professor Adam Jaffe from the School of Women’s and Children’s Health, received a $485,000 grant from Australian Genomics Health Alliance to assist a network of doctors and researchers collaborate to improve healthcare for children affected by interstitial and diffuse lung disease ( or chILD). There are about 7,000 known rare diseases, affecting about 1.2 million people in Australia, roughly equivalent to the number of people with diabetes.
  • A former cosmetic doctor who was barred from practising has been fined $100,000 for continuing to treat patients. Mohamad Anwar was given the fine – the largest imposed for such an offence – at Melbourne magistrates’ court after he pleaded guilty to 4 charges of holding himself out as a registered medical practitioner when he was not.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 6th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2018-02-03/how-cultural-barriers-can-hamper-breast-cancer-screening/9391388

When it comes to breast cancer screening in culturally and linguistically diverse communities (or CALD), there are varied and complex reasons that can hinder important messages about early detection. A recent analysis of five studies involving more than one thousand seven hundred first-generation Chinese, African, Arabic, Korean and Indian-Australian women found just nineteen percent identified as “breast aware”, and only twenty seven percent aged forty or above had participated in annual clinical breast exams. Lead researcher Doctor Cannas Kwok, who’s been investigating the breast cancer beliefs and attitudes of migrant Australian women since two thousand five, says the results, published in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, are concerning.
….
While migrant women tend to have a lower risk of developing breast cancer than Australian-born women, their individual risk increases after they migrate from low-risk countries, such as those in Asia, to Western countries, like Australia.

The study, led by researchers at Western Sydney University, identified several factors that affected the breast cancer beliefs and screening behaviours of migrant Australian women.
They found the length of time women had been living in Australia, their employment status, relationship status, and knowledge of the English language all played a part.
….
When it comes to older women, the research showed positive signs of change. More than sixty percent of migrant women surveyed (aged fifty to seventy four) had attended biannual mammograms — slightly higher than the national figure of fifty five percent. However recent data from BreastScreen Australia, the national breast cancer screening program, shows there is still more work to be done. At a national level, women from non-English speaking backgrounds continue to screen at lower rate than the general population, at forty eight percent (compared to fifty five percent).

https://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/health/boost-unsw-research-rare-childhood-lung-disease

Babies and children with chronic rare lung diseases will receive next generation genome testing to improve diagnosis, early detection and treatment as part of a new University New South Wales medical research study funded by Australian Genomics Health Alliance.

The UNSW research team, led by Professor Adam Jaffe from the School of Women’s and Children’s Health, received a four hundred eighty five thousand dollar grant from Australian Genomics Health Alliance to assist a network of doctors and researchers collaborate to improve healthcare for children affected by interstitial and diffuse lung disease ( or chILD).
….
chILD is a group of about two hundred rare chronic lung diseases that affects roughly one in every one hundred thousand children born in Australia. These diseases cause a thickening of the lung tissue, due to scarring, inflammation or fluid build-up. This thickening affects the oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange by the lungs, causing symptoms including rapid breathing, chronic coughing and weight loss. The diseases have a childhood mortality rate of about ten percent.

There are about seven thousand known rare diseases, affecting about one point two million people in Australia, roughly equivalent to the number of people with diabetes.
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/feb/02/melbourne-cosmetic-doctor-fined-100000-for-practising-while-barred

A former cosmetic doctor who was barred from practising has been fined one hundred thousand dollars for continuing to treat patients. Mohamad Anwar was given the fine – the largest imposed for such an offence – at Melbourne magistrates’ court after he pleaded guilty to four charges of holding himself out as a registered medical practitioner when he was not.

The charges were laid after an investigation by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency. On August nineteen, Anwar was suspended by the Ahpra board, which meant he could not practise. The court heard on Thursday that a few weeks after being suspended, Anwar continued to practise at the Victorian Cosmetic and Laser Clinic.

In August the Herald Sun reported that Anwar, who also practised under the name Doctor Faizal Anwar, was being sued by at least twelve women who allege he performed procedures such as facelifts and breast surgery that left them scarred and traumatised. The chief executive of AHPRA, Martin Fletcher, said the fine should send a strong message to unscrupulous practitioners.

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