The Health News United Kingdom March 13 2018

  • Chickenpox is a disease typically caught by children but that can easily spread to adults – and cause them to have even nastier symptoms. Lasting around 7 days, the infection brings out carriers in itching lesions that eventually scab over, as well as lumps in the mouth and a snotty nose. Around 90% of the UK population has had chickenpox by the age of 15. Adult males are likely to suffer more severe symptoms that women and children, and adults generally have more serious symptoms than children.
  • A new report has revealed that poor, rural societies which ate high-quality foods bought locally had the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain.  The healthiest regions, measured by low mortality rates, were often the most isolated. In those areas, people would have consumed plenty of locally-produced potatoes, whole grains, vegetables, fish and milk. There were also fewer deaths there from pulmonary tuberculosis.
  • NHS bosses are under fire for cutting back a team of doctors and nurses who provide mental health care to one of Britain’s largest groups of homeless people. A leaked CCG document reveals that Camden NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in north London is giving the Focus Homeless Outreach team £219,866 less a year starting on April 1. One of the team’s two psychiatrists and one of its six nurses will lose their jobs as a result.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 13th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://metro.co.uk/2018/03/04/chickenpox-contagious-can-avoid-catching-7359744/

Chickenpox is a disease typically caught by children but that can easily spread to adults – and cause them to have even nastier symptoms.

Adults caring for children with chickenpox are at risk of catching it, and those who’ve already had chickenpox are also at risk of developing shingles.

A carrier of chickenpox becomes contagious two days before the disease shows itself via a rash, so at that stage it’s impossible to avoid contact. Symptoms only begin to show ten to twenty one days after you’ve been infected. Because the disease is airborne it is spread through coughs and sneezes, and if you touch someone’s chickenpox blisters or nasal discharge, you can catch it that way as well.

You’re only likely to be protected from infection four days after the rashes have vanished, however.

A person only ever gets chickenpox once in their life, or at least the symptoms only ever show themselves once.  Around ninety percent of the UK population has had chickenpox by the age of fifteen. Adult males are likely to suffer more severe symptoms than women and children, and adults generally have more serious symptoms than children.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43323098

A new report has revealed that poor, rural societies which ate high-quality foods bought locally had the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain.  The healthiest regions, measured by low mortality rates, were often the most isolated. In those areas, people would have consumed plenty of locally-produced potatoes, whole grains, vegetables, fish and milk. There were also fewer deaths there from pulmonary tuberculosis. The researchers wrote in JRSM Open that
people had better diets.

They found the most nutritious diets were enjoyed in isolated, rural areas of England, the mainland and islands of Scotland and the west of Ireland – which was at that time part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Doctor Peter Greaves, study author from the Leicester Cancer Research Centre, said: “The fact that these better-fed regions of Britain also showed lower mortality rates is entirely consistent with recent studies that have shown a decreased risk of death, following improvement towards a higher Mediterranean dietary standard.”
….
Doctor Greaves said these changes in Victorian society led to worse diets among poor, rural populations and resulted in locally-produced food becoming less diverse – something that has since occurred across the world.

In the middle of the nineteenth Century, fewer than half of the near nineteen million people in England and Wales were living in large urban centres. Among the three million population of Scotland, only one million lived in town districts, while fewer than thirty percent of the five point five million population of Ireland was urban. For many poor people across Britain, white bread made from bolted wheat flour was the staple component of the diet.
….
Poor people living in wealthier farming districts who were usually paid in cash often had great difficulty getting these foods on a regular basis, but in more isolated areas of Britain milk and fish were more accessible.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/mar/10/nhs-slashes-funds-homeless-mental-health-unit-north-london-focus-camden

NHS bosses are under fire for cutting back a team of doctors and nurses who provide mental health care to one of Britain’s largest groups of homeless people. A leaked CCG document reveals that Camden NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in north London is giving the Focus Homeless Outreach team two hundred nineteen thousand eight hundred sixty six pounds less a year starting on April one. One of the team’s two psychiatrists and one of its six nurses will lose their jobs as a result.

Critics say the decision makes a mockery of Theresa May and Jeremy Hunt’s repeated claims that NHS mental health services are receiving record amounts of funding to improve care. They fear it will lead to more rough sleepers suffering mental health crises and killing themselves, and that it will add to the already heavy demand for care being faced by hospitals and general practitioners in Camden.

The CCG is pressing ahead with the forty two percent cut to the five hundred twenty one thousand pounds budget it gave the team this year despite a storm of protest from local GPs, psychiatrists, homeless charities and managers of hostels where rough sleepers sometimes stay. Camden had the third highest rate of rough sleeping in England in two thousand seventeen, recent government statistics showed – more than Manchester, Bristol and Cornwall.

Focus, set up twenty five years ago, helps treat the high levels of depression, psychosis and other mental health conditions found in rough sleepers, hostel dwellers and “sofa surfers”, including some asylum seekers and people who have been trafficked. Its budget is being reduced even though it is regarded by NHS, local council and social work bosses in London as a model of good practice of how to reach the kind of group that often shuns traditional NHS services.

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