The Health News Australia March 13 2018

  • A new online tool from Queensland researchers will tell people their risk level of developing deadly melanoma. People over forty will now be able to check their risk of developing melanoma using a new online tool designed by Queensland researchers.
    The QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute developed the online test based on data from nearly 42,000 people aged from their 40s to 70s.
  • The female visitor took in Melbourne’s CBD, headed to St. Kilda beach, checked out Phillip Island and visited the Great Ocean Road before she was diagnosed with measles and taken to hospital for treatment. All the while she was carrying the virus, which has now prompted Victorian health authorities to be on the lookout for the highly infectious disease at key tourist locations the woman visited in and around Melbourne. Health authorities said a large number of people may have been exposed around Melbourne and parts of Victoria while infectious.
  • MORE WA women are getting breast cancer but their chances of surviving have dramatically improved, with almost 100% of those in the earliest stage now beating the disease. Figures from a special report by WA’s Cancer Registry, tracking survival rates since 1985, show 92% of women who develop breast cancer are alive 5 years after diagnosis.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 13th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/medical-technology/65/news/aap/queensland-researchers-developed-a-new-tool-to-measure-melanoma-risk/3228/

A new online tool from Queensland researchers will tell people their risk level of developing deadly melanoma. People over forty will now be able to check their risk of developing melanoma using a new online tool designed by Queensland researchers.

The QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute developed the online test based on data from nearly forty two thousand people aged from their forties to seventies. Professor David Whiteman from QIMR Berghofer said early detection of melanoma is vital, and the tool they’ve developed can help people identify if they’re at risk.

Professor Whiteman added: “This online risk predictor will help identify those people with the highest likelihood of developing melanoma so that they and their doctors can decide how to best manage their risk.” In two thousand eighteen nearly two thousand people are predicted to die from melanoma across Australia, while over fourteen thousand new cases are expected to be diagnosed. Melanoma related hospital expenses cost the Australian healthcare system two hundred one million dollars in two thousand seventeen.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/measles-alert-for-melbourne-and-surrounds/news-story/3140e2ade0e06f833255e01f2541bd27

The female visitor took in Melbourne’s CBD, headed to Saint Kilda beach, checked out Phillip Island and visited the Great Ocean Road before she was diagnosed with measles and taken to hospital for treatment.

All the while she was carrying the virus, which has now prompted Victorian health authorities to be on the lookout for the highly infectious disease at key tourist locations the woman visited in and around Melbourne. Health authorities said a large number of people may have been exposed around Melbourne and parts of Victoria while infectious.

The woman visited several locations in Melbourne’s CBD, including Flinders Backpackers, Saint Kilda beach, Phillip Island, and the Great Ocean Road between Geelong and Warrnambool, from Saturday until Wednesday. Anyone who visited Flinders Street Station, Saint Kilda Beach, Phillip Island or the lookouts along the Great Ocean Road between March three and March seven may have been exposed. Victoria’s deputy chief health officer Doctor Brett Sutton warned “many people” may have been exposed, and symptoms could show up until March twenty one.
….
Measles can cause serious illness, particularly in the young. Anyone who is unvaccinated is at risk. Early symptoms include a runny nose, cough, fever and rash. The rash usually begins on the face and spreads down the body.

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/health/survival-rates-improve-for-breast-cancer-ng-b88767597z

More Western Australia women are getting breast cancer but their chances of surviving have dramatically improved, with almost one hundred percent of those in the earliest stage now beating the disease. Figures from a special report by WA’s Cancer Registry, tracking survival rates since nineteen eighty five, show ninety two percent of women who develop breast cancer are alive five years after diagnosis.

Early detection and better cancer treatments are being credited for the remarkable improvement in the survival rate, which was seventy four percent in the late nineteen eighties. The report shows women aged forty to sixty four have the best chances of surviving for five years compared with younger and older age groups.

While only one-third of women with the most advanced stage are alive after five years, women with stage one —the most common form — now have a survival rate of ninety nine percent. Nationally, one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer by age eighty five — about sixteen thousand a year. Cancer Council WA director of education and research Terry Slevin said the new figures showed a stark improvement in surviving breast cancer in WA since the late nineteen eighties.
….
Health Minister Roger Cook said that while the twelve thousand new cases of cancer in WA each year were alarming, the increase in survival rates, particularly for breast cancer, was a testament to the State’s health services and staff. The State Government was supporting the Cancer Council’s Find Cancer Early campaign and the Future Health Research and Innovation Fund which would drive a cancer research plan for the next decade.

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.