The Health News USA March 19 2018

  • According to a first-of-its-kind study, excessive drinking can kill you and claims the lives of an estimated 88,000 Americans per year. That’s 1 in 10 deaths in working-age adults and more than half are related to binge drinking. According to the study by the CDC, some 37 million adults or about 17% reported binge drinking. A binge drinker typically drinks about once a week, drinking 7 drinks within 2 hours. For men it’s having 5 or more alcoholic drinks in a 2-hour window; women need to drink at least 4 drinks in that span for it be considered binging.
  • Glenn Close’s character in “Fatal Attraction” is one of her most memorable roles — and is considered one of the great villains of the 20th century. In that 1987 blockbuster, Close played Alex Forrest, a woman scorned after an affair with a married man, played by Michael Douglas. Today, Close knows something she didn’t back then — that mental illness runs in her own family.  Her nephew, Calen has schizophrenia; and Glenn’s sister Jessie has bipolar disorder. Jessie Close said she struggled with mental illness her whole life, before she was diagnosed at age 50. Glenn and Jessie started a foundation in 2010 called Bring Change to Mind which creates multimedia campaigns and holds events to get people to talk about mental health.
  • Unable to obtain drugs to use for its lethal injections, Oklahoma will use inert gas inhalation as the primary method for death penalty executions once a protocol is developed and finalized, the state’s attorney general announced Wednesday. Nitrogen is one of several inert gases that can cause hypoxia, an oxygen deficiency that causes death. Currently, 49 people sit on death row in Oklahoma; 16 have exhausted their ability to appeal their cases.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 19th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/america-binge-175-billion-drinks-worth-study/story?id=53795860

According to a first-of-its-kind study, excessive drinking can kill you and claims the lives of an estimated eighty eight thousand Americans per year. That’s one in ten deaths in working-age adults and more than half are related to binge drinking.

According to the study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some thirty seven million adults or about seventeen percent reported binge drinking. A binge drinker typically drinks about once a week, drinking seven drinks within two hours. For men it’s having five or more alcoholic drinks in a two-hour window; women need to drink at least four drinks in that span for it be considered binging.

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is a phone survey that collects yearly data on health and risk behaviors of U.S. adults. For the first time, gathering data on two thousand fifteen, they asked about four hundred thousand people over eighteen, including underage drinkers from eighteen to twenty, about their drinking “in the past thirty days.” That includes how many days they drank, the average number of drinks consumed and the largest number of drinks they had on any one occasion. In all, the study found there were a staggering seventeen point five billion binge drinks consumed per year.

For binge drinkers, four out of every five drinks were consumed by men. That’s about fourteen billion of those seventeen point five billion drinks, and they were drinking about twice as much as women. The biggest bingers were non-Hispanic whites (nineteen point two percent) and American Indians/Alaska Natives (seventeen point nine percent). And though binging was higher among younger age groups, it was present across all ages, including those sixty five years old or older.
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The Mississippi River Valley Region — including Arkansas, Mississippi, and Kentucky — had the highest number of binge drinks per adult; Hawaii was also near the top. The areas with fewer binge drinks were the District of Columbia, New Jersey, New York and Washington.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/changing-minds-glenn-closes-personal-battle-to-destigmatize-mental-illness/

Glenn Close’s character in “Fatal Attraction” is one of her most memorable roles — and is considered one of the great villains of the twentieth century. In that nineteen eighty seven blockbuster, Close played Alex Forrest, a woman scorned after an affair with a married man, played by Michael Douglas.
…..
Close said that “I’m always amazed that when I was researching that role, that no one brought up the idea that she might have a mental disorder or that she might have a behavior triggered by something in her past. I think if I was offered that script today, I would certainly look at it from a totally different point of view.” That’s because today, Close knows something she didn’t back then — that mental illness runs in her own family.  Her nephew, Calen has schizophrenia; and Glenn’s sister Jessie has bipolar disorder. Jessie Close said she struggled with mental illness her whole life, before she was diagnosed at age fifty.
….
In two thousand and three, a frightened Jessie confided her suicidal thoughts to her sister, and they got help. Glenn said she thought she was very close to losing her: “I never knew how close. Many people who live with bipolar disorder have deaths by suicide.” The sisters say Jessie’s treatment was successful because Jessie wanted help.  But they also say far too many people are still suffering in silence.
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That thinking led Glenn and Jessie to start a foundation in two thousand ten. Bring Change to Mind creates multimedia campaigns and holds events to get people to talk about mental health. Glenn Close and her sister Jessie say they’ll keep working until mental illness is seen as just what it is — another part of being human.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/03/14/health/inert-gas-death-penalty-oklahoma-bn/index.html

Unable to obtain drugs to use for its lethal injections, Oklahoma will use inert gas inhalation as the primary method for death penalty executions once a protocol is developed and finalized, the state’s attorney general announced Wednesday. Attorney General Mike Hunter said: “As you know, in Oklahoma, a bill that was signed back in two thousand fifteen by the governor states that if lethal injection is held unconstitutional or is unavailable, an execution shall be carried out by nitrogen hypoxia.” We are exercising that option.”

Nitrogen is one of several inert gases that can cause hypoxia, an oxygen deficiency that causes death. Oklahoma Department of Corrections Director Joe M. Allbaugh said his office will prepare the legal documents within the next ninety to one hundred twenty days and, if that’s acceptable, the attorney general will move forward with the protocol. Hunter said the state is “at the very beginning of this process … and will provide updates as they become available.” Currently, forty nine people sit on death row in Oklahoma; sixteen have exhausted their ability to appeal their cases. The state has struggled to find legally obtainable lethal injection drugs.

Pharmaceutical companies have refused to supply the drugs in response to global campaigns against the death penalty, and the lack of legally obtainable drugs led the state to impose a moratorium on capital punishment executions in October two thousand fifteen.

Oklahoma reenacted the death penalty in nineteen seventy three and, since nineteen seventy six, has performed one hundred twelve executions. Hunter noted that an overwhelming majority of the Oklahoma electorate voted to amend the Constitution and guarantee the state’s power to impose capital punishment two years ago.

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