The Health News – 28 March 2017

Overview:
• South Australian coroner Mark Johns is investigating Rita Ann Broadway’s death in early 2015. The 66-year- old woman, who was in a wheelchair, was taken to Modbury Hospital by ambulance after complaining of pain near her bladder catheter and the inquest heard her requests went unmet for it to be changed. recommended.

• Flavour chemist and sensory scientist Dr Heather Smyth told a forum at the World Science Festival in Brisbane that taste was the fusion of a food’s flavour, smell and touch into a single sensation.

• Ten people in Sydney’s inner-west are being monitored for tuberculosis (TB), after an initial failure to diagnose a student with the infection, the New South Wales Health Department says. The director of NSW Health’s communicable diseases branch Vicky Sheppeard said the man’s family and friends will now be monitored for TB for up to two years.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the  28th of March 2017. Read by Rebecca Foster. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-27/sa-coroner-told-woman-died-alone-after-hospital-discharge/8390634

A woman died alone and in pain two days after she was discharged from an Adelaide hospital emergency department, an inquest has heard.

South Australian coroner Mark Johns is investigating Rita Ann Broadway’s death in early 2015.

The 66-year-old woman, who was in a wheelchair, was taken to Modbury Hospital by ambulance after complaining of pain near her bladder catheter and the inquest heard her requests went unmet for it to be changed.

The woman contacted the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS) the next day and told a nurse she needed someone to attend her home because of her pain level.

She was told she would have to wait a further day until a visit was possible, the coroner heard.

Counsel assisting the coroner Naomi Kereru said there was no evidence the nurse ever organised that visit.

A friend of Ms Broadway went to her house and found her in an unresponsive state after her repeated phone calls went unanswered.

Modbury Hospital doctor Thomas Quigley, who examined Ms Broadway, said he did not change the catheter because it was draining well and he believed its removal would have increased the woman’s pain, for which he prescribed painkillers and a skin cream.

Professor Anne-Maree Kelly compiled a nine-page report on the case and attended the inquest as a medical expert.

She said Dr Quigley’s description of Ms Broadway’s behaviour, in patient notes, suggested he thought she was exaggerating her condition.

Professor Kelly said there seemed no reason not to have changed the catheter and a urinary tract infection should have been the patient’s primary diagnosis.

During her evidence, Professor Kelly cited a checklist used by medical practitioners in the United Kingdom to help identify catheter-related urinary tract infections and urged South Australia consider such a protocol.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-27/world-science-festival-food-for-thought/8389700

Science may be able to explain why some people prefer smooth peanut paste while others love crunchy.

Flavour chemist and sensory scientist Dr Heather Smyth told a forum at the World Science Festival in Brisbane that taste was the fusion of a food’s flavour, smell and touch into a single sensation.

Her research involved measuring human sensory responses to food and understanding the compositional basis of flavour.

“When we put a certain food in our mouth, not only do we have taste going on but you also have the aroma volatiles — the compounds in the food that travel up the back of the throat and interact with our sense of aroma,” Dr Smyth said.

“How it sounds to us if something’s crunchy and crispy or whether it’s soggy and stale will ultimately influence our perception of whether or not we like it.”

According to Dr Smyth, texture can play a huge role.

She said familiarity, cultural differences and expectations were also likely to play a key role in taste preferences.

For most people, food leads to a powerful and often healing sensory experience, with the mere sight, smell or taste of it bringing feelings of happiness, euphoria, love and peace, she explained.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-27/tuberculosis-misdiagnosed-in-sydney-student-for-months/8389094

Ten people in Sydney’s inner-west are being monitored for tuberculosis (TB), after an initial failure to diagnose a student with the infection, the New South Wales Health Department says.

The man, who had been backpacking in South-East Asia, felt unwell for several months and repeatedly visited his GP.

However it was not until the 23-year-old was taken to Royal Prince Alfred (RPA) Hospital in October last year that tests confirmed he had TB, a department spokesperson said.

The director of NSW Health’s communicable diseases branch Vicky Sheppeard said the man’s family and friends will now be monitored for TB for up to two years.

It is typical in a case such as this to notify up to 20 people, she said.

The Opposition’s health spokesman Walt Secord said he was concerned it took several visits to the GP for the student to be finally diagnosed at RPA, leaving his friends and relatives potentially exposed.

A spokeswoman for the Federal Department of Health said it would be following up with NSW Health over the case.