The Health News US March 27 2018

  • A U.S. study suggests that even people with common and often treatable mental health problems like depression and anxiety may have a harder time than patients without these diagnoses getting admitted to a high-quality nursing home. Researchers examined data on more than 3.7 million admissions to 15,600 facilities nationwide from 2012 to 2014. By the last year of the study, people with depression and anxiety were 8% less likely to gain admission to a nursing home with the highest Medicare quality rating of five stars than individuals without mental health problems.
  • According to a report from ABC News, doctors may have found a way to freeze a nerve in the back that carries hunger signals to the brain and reduces appetite.  Doctors from Emory University School of Medicine studied people who were “moderately” to “severely” obese to see if there is a connection between the “hunger nerve” and one’s ability to lose weight — and keep it off. The “hunger nerve,” also called the posterior vagal trunk, signals your brain that you’re hungry when your stomach is empty.
  • The Hawaii State Department of Health issued a final report on cleaning up two vacant commercial lots contaminated by arsenic on the Big Island. The report recommends removing contaminated soil in the lots near Waiakea Villas in Hilo and hauling it to a landfill, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported Sunday. The report said that the cleanup would cost $312,825.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-psychiatry-nursing-homes/top-quality-nursing-homes-harder-to-access-with-mental-health-issues-idUSKBN1GZ36V

 

A U.S. study suggests that even people with common and often treatable mental health problems like depression and anxiety may have a harder time than patients without these diagnoses getting admitted to a high-quality nursing home. Researchers examined data on more than three point seven million admissions to fifteen thousand six hundred facilities nationwide from two thousand twelve to two thousand fourteen. By the last year of the study, people with depression and anxiety were eight percent less likely to gain admission to a nursing home with the highest Medicare quality rating of five stars than individuals without mental health problems.

The odds of admission to top nursing homes were longer with more severe mental health issues. With bipolar disorder, patients were eleven percent less likely to go to a five-star facility than people without mental health problems; the odds were twenty eighty percent lower with schizophrenia, twenty seven percent lower with a substance abuse problem and thirty two percent lower with personality disorders.
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The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rates nursing homes on a scale of one to five stars based on staffing levels, quality benchmarks and results from health inspections. Even after excluding dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, which are common causes of nursing home admissions, people with behavioral health issues account for about half of all residents, researchers note in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.
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Compared to people without mental illness, patients with depression and anxiety were just one percent more likely to go to one-star nursing homes by the last year of the study. But patients with bipolar disorder were eleven percent more likely to wind up in a one-star facility, and the odds were fifteen percent higher with a substance abuse problem, eighteen percent higher with personality disorders and twenty eight percent higher with schizophrenia.

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http://www.foxnews.com/health/2018/03/23/freezing-hunger-nerve-could-help-with-weight-loss-new-study-finds.html

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According to a report from ABC News, doctors may have found a way to freeze a nerve in the back that carries hunger signals to the brain and reduces appetite.  Doctors from Emory University School of Medicine studied people who were “moderately” to “severely” obese to see if there is a connection between the “hunger nerve” and one’s ability to lose weight — and keep it off. The “hunger nerve,” also called the posterior vagal trunk, signals your brain that you’re hungry when your stomach is empty.

Lead researcher Doctor David Prologo in a news video release said: “Ninety-five percent of people who embark on a diet on their own will fail or gain their weight back at the six- or twelve-month mark.” The reason for this is the body’s backlash to the calorie restriction.”

Doctors were able to shut down the signal of the “hunger nerve” in ten patients by surgically inserting a needle into the patient’s back, freezing the nerve for two minutes, with the guidance of live images from a CT scan. In seven, forty five and ninety-day follow-up visits, patients  

reported a decreased appetite at each clinic appointment, with an average weight loss of three point six percent along with a thirteen point nine percent decrease in body mass index numbers.
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The study was presented at the Society for Interventional Radiology Conference this week in Los Angeles. Prologo and his team plan to do a larger trial to better understand if the procedure works in a lasting way.

 

https://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Hawaii-Health-Department-calls-for-removal-of-12780106.php

 

The Hawaii State Department of Health issued a final report on cleaning up two vacant commercial lots contaminated by arsenic on the Big Island. The report recommends removing contaminated soil in the lots near Waiakea Villas in Hilo and hauling it to a landfill, the Hawaii Tribune-Herald reported Sunday. The report said that the cleanup would cost three hundred twelve thousand eight hundred twenty five dollars.

John Peard, remediation project manager at the health department said that removing the contaminated soil could require up to two hundred truckloads. The soil is contaminated with arsenic from a former plant that used sugarcane bagasse to create canec, a wall- and ceiling-board panel used extensively in Hawaii until the nineteen seventies. Ar senic was used to make the material resistant to termites. The plant dumped hundreds of tons of arsenic into Waiakea Pond.
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Peard said that a prospective buyer interested in a commercial development on the vacant lots was required to pay for the study. It is the fourth study done on the property in the past fifteen years.

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