The Health News United Kingdom March 18 2018

  • Life expectancy is falling, Oxford University experts have warned, saying the trends could hit the middle class the hardest. Writing in the British Medical Journal, they revealed a 13% rise in death rates in the first months of this year in England and Wales, as the NHS came under strain. They revealed an extra 10,000 deaths in the 1st 7 weeks of this year, compared with average figures in the last 5 years. The trends may hit the middle classes hardest, especially women, as they are most likely to gain from extra years at the end of life.
  • The head of the NHS has said that Brexit can help Britain beat the “battle of the bulge.” Simon Stevens said freedom from EU law will mean the UK could introduce tougher rules on the food and drink industry. He called for the Government to take “assertive” action to cut obesity rates, suggesting post-Brexit Britain could see the introduction of measures like mandatory calorie labels on packaging. Mr. Stevens added that cutting obesity would help reduce the number of cases of diabetes and other diseases like cancer.
  • UK employers show a lack of interest in the mental wellbeing of employees, even though many staff are suffering from stress, according to a new study of nearly 1,300 workers by ADP.  The research reveals that a third of UK workers (31%) say their employer has little or no interest in their mental health, despite the fact that a fifth (twenty percent percent) are stressed out on a daily basis, and for almost a third (33%) the issue is so bad that they’re considering looking for a new role.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 18th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/14/life-expectancy-fall-one-year-middle-classes-among-hardest-hit/

Life expectancy is falling, Oxford University experts have warned, saying the trends could hit the middle class the hardest. Writing in the British Medical Journal, they revealed a thirteen percent rise in death rates in the first months of this year in England and Wales, as the NHS came under strain. And they said “awful” increases in death rates in recent years had forced the Office for National Statistics or ONS to revise its forecasts, reducing UK predicted life span by almost a full year. They revealed an extra ten thousand deaths in the first seven weeks of this year, compared with average figures in the last five years.

And they warned that the trends may hit the middle classes hardest, especially women, as they are most likely to gain from extra years at the end of life. The researchers called for an urgent investigation into the recent spike in deaths, which they said could not be explained by the increase in flu or the ageing population. Professor Danny Dorling, from Oxford University, said the recent trends followed years which have shown deep dips in mortality rates.
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The latest projections estimate that by two thousand forty one, life expectancy for women will be eighty six point two years – a drop from the eighty six point nine years estimated two years before.  And for men, the figure has dropped from eighty four point one years to eighty three point four years. The trends could hit middle class pensioners particularly hard.
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Writing in the BMJ, Professor Dorling and Lucinda Hiam from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine called on the health select committee to urgently investigate the matter.
In an editorial, they highlighted a squeeze on NHS funding in the last five years.
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Professor Dorling said the UK trends were in contrast with those across the rest of Europe, where life expectancy was rising.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/14/brexit-can-help-britain-beat-battle-bulge-nhs-chief-vows/

The head of the NHS has said that Brexit can help Britain beat the “battle of the bulge.” Simon Stevens said freedom from EU law will mean the UK could introduce tougher rules on the food and drink industry. He called for the Government to take “assertive” action to cut obesity rates, suggesting post-Brexit Britain could see the introduction of measures like mandatory calorie labels on packaging.

Other ideas under consideration include labels showing how many spoonfuls of sugar each packet contains. Speaking at the the Diabetes UK Professional Conference in London, he said more action would be needed if the Government was to meet its target of cutting added sugar in children’s diets by twenty percent by two thousand twenty.

Mister Stevens added that cutting obesity would help reduce the number of cases of diabetes and other diseases like cancer. Seven in ten millennials are expected to be overweight or obese by the time they are aged thirty five to forty five, compared to five in ten baby boomers.

NHS chiefs may consider moves such as demanding manufacturers specify how many spoonfuls of sugar each packet contains, limiting children’s exposure to junk food marketing and reducing the number of takeaways allowed to open around schools. Other ideas which could be considered include making traffic light food labels compulsory instead of voluntary and expanding the sugar tax to include food and milk-based drinks.

https://www.thehrdirector.com/business-news/mental-health/employers-neglecting-mental-health/

UK employers show a lack of interest in the mental wellbeing of employees, even though many staff are suffering from stress, according to a new study of nearly one thousand three hundred workers by ADP.  The research reveals that a third of UK workers or thirty one percent say their employer has little or no interest in their mental health, despite the fact that a fifth or twenty percent are stressed out on a daily basis, and for almost a third or thirty three percent the issue is so bad that they’re considering looking for a new role.

Mental health issues have risen in prominence in recent years, with high profile figures, such as Prince William and Prince Harry, speaking out to break the taboo around the subject, which affects one in four people every year. Yet despite this shift, the findings indicate that many employers are still brushing the issue under the carpet.

Jeff Phipps, Managing Director at ADP UK stated:“Employees who endure consistently high levels of stress are in danger of suffering from anxiety and even burnout. This can lead to more serious mental health issues, which will impact not only their performance, but also their career, and personal life for a long period of time.”

Workplace stress peaks amongst younger employees, according to the study, with twenty two percent of workers under thirty five saying they experience stress every day, and forty two percent saying that it is so bad, they’re considering jumping ship. This contrasts with only nineteen percent and twenty six percent respectively of those over thirty five who feel this way, suggesting employees become better at managing stress as they get older. The findings also shine a spotlight on the impact of staffing and funding cuts on the healthcare sector, with two in five healthcare professionals or forty percent considering leaving their role due to stress – the highest of any industry. Healthcare workers are also amongst the most likely to say their employer isn’t interested in their mental wellbeing, a sentiment felt by thirty five percent of respondents, which is only likely to exacerbate the problem.

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