The Health News USA October 5 2017

  • After horrific events like shootings or attacks by terrorists, parents are faced with the dilemma of how to talk to their children about something so senseless and indiscriminate.  Dr. Gail Saltz, author of “The Power of Different: The Link Between Disorder and Genius,” advises parents that they should comfort their children by telling them these attacks may seem more frequent due to the global nature of news and the repetition of images surrounding the events on social media.
  • The fight against the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), which has killed at least 722 people over the past five years, is honing in on its target: camels. Saudi Arabia has been heavily criticized for not being transparent about MERS.
  • 3 US scientists, Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young have won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm,” otherwise known as our biological clock.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://edition.cnn.com/2015/11/16/health/talking-to-kids-tragic-events-advice-parents/index.html

After horrific events like shootings or attacks by terrorists, parents are faced with the dilemma of how to talk to their children about something so senseless and indiscriminate.  “It’s important to explain to children the rarity of these events,” said Doctor Gail Saltz, who has been in private practice as a psychiatrist for more than twenty years. Saltz, whose latest book is “The Power of Different: The Link Between Disorder and Genius,” said parents can comfort their children by telling them these attacks may seem more frequent due to the global nature of news and the repetition of images surrounding the events on social media. Saltz, who also hosts “The Power of Different” podcast, said parents can also tell their children that security will likely be increased in response to an event like this to work to keep people safe.

Parents should be concrete about how their children are safe and the concrete measures that are taken to protect them. Parents should also realize that increased anxiety after an event like this is normal, experts say, even if the attack happened in another country, because social media makes the world feel very small. Parents should keep an eye out for “dramatic changes” in behavior such as the way their kids interact with family and friends, or if they experience a sudden drop in grades, said Kelly Ward Becker, chief executive officer of Family Lives on Foundation, which supports the emotional well-being of grieving children.
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If possible, children younger than five do not need to be told about what happened or exposed to any of the media coverage. Children ages six to eleven need just basic facts and minimal exposure to media coverage, adding that there are definite lessons from what children saw in the media following the September eleven, two thousand one attacks. Doctor Saltz said parents of young children should “stick to basic broad-stroke facts” and avoid any “nitty gritty details that are disturbing.” Parents should then communicate to their children an openness and willingness to talk, answering their questions and listening to their feelings, she said. For teens, who will most likely have heard about violent events or attacks through social media or news coverage, it is best to start by asking what they know. Parents should also not assume their children are processing the events or trauma surrounding the events the same way they are, she added.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-mers/health-experts-zero-in-on-camels-to-fight-deadly-mers-virus-idUSKCN1C61OC

The fight against the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome or MERS, which has killed at least seven hundred twenty two people over the past five years, is honing in on its target: camels. MERS coronavirus, a member of a virus family ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, appears to have emerged in humans in Saudi Arabia in two thousand twelve, but has now been traced back in camels to at least nineteen eighty three.

Almost all the outbreaks so far originated in the Arabian Gulf, but MERS-CoV could infect humans wherever there are one-humped dromedary camels – two-humped bactrians are not affected. That means people across a swathe of Africa, the Middle East, Pakistan and South Asia are potentially at risk. So the hunt is on for vaccinations – both for humans, and camels.
People have probably caught MERS in Africa but the absence of outbreaks recorded there may be due to poor disease surveillance, less contact with camels, or lower rates of underlying conditions like obesity and heart problems that make MERS more severe. Saudi Arabia has been heavily criticized for not being transparent about MERS, but Van Kerkhove said that had totally changed.

MERS is hard to spot, and far more deadly than other acute respiratory infections, killing one in three sufferers. A dozen human vaccines are in development, with vaccine coalition CEPI expected to announce soon which it will fund.

http://edition.cnn.com/2017/10/02/health/nobel-medicine-prize-circadian-rhythm/index.html

Three US scientists have won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “for their discoveries of   molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm,” otherwise known as our biological clock, the Nobel committee said. Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young were awarded the prize for their research on how plants, humans and animals adapt their biological rhythm to synchronize with our planet’s day and night cycle, as the earth rotates, in order to control their daily life. Hall spent most of his career at Brandeis University in Massachusetts, where Rosbash still works as a faculty member. Young works out of Rockefeller University in New York. The winners will share a prize of nine million Swedish kronor, which is around one point one million dollar. All living organisms on Earth have an internal clock, known as the circadian rhythm, which in humans underlies why we are awake during the day and sleep at night. But our biological clock also helps regulate eating habits, hormone release, blood pressure and body temperature. The US trio used fruit flies to discover a gene that controls this everyday rhythm and further showed that the gene encoded a protein which “accumulates in the cell during the night and degrades during the day,” to regulate this cycle, the committee said in a statement.

According to the Nobel committee, a person’s well-being is affected when there is a “temporary mismatch between our external environment and this internal biological clock.” For example, disruption to our clocks when someone travels across a number of time zones results in jet lag. The committee explained how an imbalance between lifestyle and rhythm could lead to increased risk for a number of diseases including metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

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