The Health News Australia February 24 2018

  • According to a new research paper, a child’s growth and development is affected by its parents’ health and lifestyle from adolescence.  Published in the journal Nature, researchers at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute say young women and men can carry lifestyle and health risks from adolescence into pregnancy, from as early as their 20s or 30s.
  • A study of Melbourne cancer patients has found a positive association between regular soft drink consumption and an increased risk of developing cancer. According to a new study, people who regularly consume at least 1 soft drink a day, no matter the size of their waist, could be at increased risk of cancer. According to the research, the more sugary soft drinks participants drank the higher their risk of cancer.
  • A person has died after ­contracting a rare illness similar to mad cow disease. Queensland Health was ­notified of the confirmed case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) last month. There is no cure for CJD, a rapidly progressive and fatal neurodegenerative human prion disease.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 24th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/early-lifestyle-choices-affect-pregnancy

According to a new research paper, a child’s growth and development is affected by its parents’ health and lifestyle from adolescence.  Published in the journal Nature, researchers at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute say young women and men can carry lifestyle and health risks from adolescence into pregnancy, from as early as their twenties or thirties.

They argue that starting baby health programs during pregnancy is “too late” and have called for greater investment in health programs for teens to secure the health of future generations.
Lead author, Professor George Patton, says tackling the areas of obesity, mental health and substance abuse is essential. Professor Patton said: “The first one thousand days of a child’s life are crucially important, but that is too late to be taking action. Current policies to promote the best possible start to life in Australia, along with most other countries, are starting too late.”
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The paper considers data from about two hundred countries and from more than one hundred forty recent studies in the research field of epigenetics – the study of changes in gene expression caused by the environment.

It considered mechanisms other than genes for how health and growth was transmitted between generations, including changes in a father’s sperm or a mother’s ovum, maternal influences around the time of conception and in later pregnancy, and parenting in the first two years after birth. One of the three main areas the researchers call for earlier action on is mental health. Obesity and substance abuse are also very important.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/nutrition-and-hydration/42/news/aap/study-shows-drinking-soft-drink-linked-to-cancer-risk/3193/

A study of Melbourne cancer patients has found a positive association between regular soft drink consumption and an increased risk of developing cancer. According to a new study, people who regularly consume at least one soft drink a day, no matter the size of their waist, could be at increased risk of cancer. Researchers at Cancer Council Victoria and University of Melbourne analysed more than three thousand cases of eleven obesity-related cancers including breast, liver and prostate reported between nineteen ninety to nineteen ninety four and two thousand three to two thousand seven through The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

Published on Thursday, the study found a positive association between soft drink consumption and cancer risk independent of obesity after adjusting for waist circumference.
The authors say the results justify the need to minimise the intake of sugar-sweetened soft drinks.

Lead researcher, Associate Professor Allison Hodge of Cancer Council Victoria’s Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division said: “Initially our hypothesis was that drinking soft drinks would cause obesity which would then cause an association with obesity-related cancers but we found that there was more beyond the affect of obesity.”
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According to the research, the more sugary soft drinks participants drank the higher their risk of cancer. Professor Hodge has stated that this was not the case with those who drank diet soft drinks, suggesting sugar could be the key. She says the “surprising” findings warrant further research.
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Cancer Council Victoria CEO Todd Harper says this new research provides another reason for Australians to avoid soft drinks and make the switch to water. Mr. Harper said:  “Sugary drinks, including soft drinks, are already known to be a cause of obesity, which greatly increases the risk of thirteen types of cancer.”

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/disease-similar-to-mad-cow-disease-claims-life-in-queensland/news-story/922ed27b329676069e386d294e897da0

A person has died after ­contracting a rare illness similar to mad cow disease. Queensland Health was ­notified of the confirmed case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) last month.

While the health service could not confirm the person’s age, gender or where they were from due to privacy reasons, its online notifiable conditions ­report stated the patient presented to the Gold Coast Hospital and Health Service. There is no cure for CJD, a rapidly progressive and fatal neurodegenerative human prion disease. A spokesman said the case was initially reported to Queensland Health in two thousand seventeen, with additional testing taking several months.

He said there were ten notifications in Queensland in two thousand seventeen. The disease is not to be confused with variant CJD — more commonly known as the mad cow disease — which was first recognised in nineteen ninety six in the United Kingdom. There are three forms of the classical strain of CJD — Sporadic CJD is the most common, occurring in just one person in every million each year.

Iatrogenic CJD can be contracted during medical and surgical procedures, while familial CJD is genetic — accounting for five to fifteen percent of classical patients. Early symptoms will range from confusion or disorientation and patients may have problems with walking.

However it has not been found in Australian livestock and there are no reported human cases in Australia to date.

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