The Health News United Kingdom February 12 2018

  • Jeremy Hunt said that too much time on sites like Facebook and Twitter could pose as great a threat to children’s health as obesity. Speaking as the government launched a £5 million scheme to train primary school staff to spot mental health problems, Mister Hunt accused technology companies of developing “seductive products aimed at ever younger children”. Ministers are examining ways to protect children from mental health problems if steps are not taken.
  • A study has found that more than one in three deaths or serious injuries suffered by a child through neglect or abuse is linked to parental drinking. A report commissioned by a cross-bench group of MPs and peers found that alcohol abuse by parents was behind horrific problems for children and warned that budgets of alcohol and drug treatment programmes were being cut. The study has found that alcohol misuse was implicated in 37% of cases of a child’s death or serious injury after abuse or neglect between 2011 and 2014.
  • Cambridge scientist say that there is mounting evidence the food on your plate can alter cancer’s growth and spread.  Animal research, published in the journal Nature, showed breast tumours struggled without the dietary nutrient asparagine. It is found in the foodies’ favourite asparagus, as well as poultry, seafood and many other foods. In the future, scientists hope to take advantage of cancer’s “culinary addictions” to improve treatment. Asparagine is an amino acid – a building block of protein – and takes its name from asparagus.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/31/facebook-urged-tell-children-spend-long-online/

Jeremy Hunt said that too much time on sites like Facebook and Twitter could pose as great a threat to children’s health as obesity. Speaking as the government launched a five million pound scheme to train primary school staff to spot mental health problems, Mister Hunt accused technology companies of developing “seductive products aimed at ever younger children”. Ministers are examining ways to protect children from mental health problems if steps are not taken.

In November he met executives from Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Google and Microsoft, to ask them to become “part of the solution” to growing levels of mental distress. He urged the tech giants to introduce pop-up messages and support for teenagers spending too much time on social media, or using it at unsocial hours, and to identify cases of cyberbullying, in a bid to “turn the tide” on damage caused by overexposure to the internet. But soon after Facebook launched a Messenger service aimed at under thirteens, spurring him to turn on the company, asking it to “stay away from my kids”.

Research has shown a sixty eight per cent rise in levels of self harm among teenage girls since two thousand eleven, which psychiatrists say has been fuelled by videos and images of such practices being shared online. Companies have also be asked to share information on levels of cyberbullying on their platforms, and the number of under-age users of their platforms.

Mr. Hunt said the new funding would help train teachers to understand how mental illness manifests itself in primary school children and how they can provide faster support to those experiencing ill health.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/feb/11/parental-alcohol-abuse-linked-to-child-deaths-and-injuries

A study has found that more than one in three deaths or serious injuries suffered by a child through neglect or abuse is linked to parental drinking. A report commissioned by a cross-bench group of Members of Parliament and peers found that alcohol abuse by parents was behind horrific problems for children and warned that budgets of alcohol and drug treatment programmes were being cut.

The study has found that alcohol misuse was implicated in thirty seven percent of cases of a child’s death or serious injury after abuse or neglect between two thousand eleven and two thousand fourteen.  More than half of councils did not have a strategy to help children of alcoholics. Referrals to alcohol treatment services were falling in more than fifty percent of local authorities, according to information released under freedom of information laws.The study also found that ninety two percent of the fifty three councils that responded were cutting budgets for alcohol and drug treatment services.

The group also found that fifteen percent of children had their bedtime routine disrupted due to their parents’ drinking and eighteen percent were embarrassed at seeing their parent drunk. According to the study, children living with alcohol-dependent parents reported feeling socially isolated and reluctant to seek help, due to feelings of stigma, shame and guilt about not wanting to betray parents.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-42976851

Cambridge scientist say that there is mounting evidence the food on your plate can alter cancer’s growth and spread.  Animal research, published in the journal Nature, showed breast tumours struggled without the dietary nutrient asparagine. It is found in the foodies’ favourite asparagus, as well as poultry, seafood and many other foods.

In the future, scientists hope to take advantage of cancer’s “culinary addictions” to improve treatment. Asparagine is an amino acid – a building block of protein – and takes its name from asparagus. The study, conducted at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, took place on mice with an aggressive form of breast cancer.

Normally they would die in a couple of weeks as the tumour spread throughout the body. But when the mice were given a low-asparagine diet or drugs to block asparagine then the tumour struggled to spread.

A cancerous cell must go through huge changes in order to spread – it must learn to break off the main tumour, survive in the bloodstream and thrive elsewhere in the body. It is this process for which researchers think asparagine is necessary. But fear not asparagus lovers, these findings still need to be confirmed in people and asparagine is hard to avoid in the diet anyway.

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