The Health News USA March 13 2018

  • A recent study suggests that states with laws that make it easier for midwives to care for pregnant women and deliver babies may have better birth outcomes than states where it’s harder for midwives to provide care. Researchers ranked each state based on how easy it was for midwives to practice and collaborate with obstetricians and other providers. Scores ranged from a low of 17 in North Carolina to a high of 61 in Washington, out of 100 points. Higher scores were associated with significantly higher proportion of babies delivered by midwives, more spontaneous vaginal deliveries and higher rates of breastfeeding.
  • Plant-based diets have been associated with many health benefits, including a reduced risk of obesity, heart disease and Type two diabetes. So it might naturally follow that vegetarian fast food, which is inherently plant-based, would be more nutritionally appealing than its traditional relatives. Sharon Palmer, a registered dietitian and author of “Plant-Powered for Life” said: “Just because a restaurant or fast food menu item says it’s vegetarian or vegan, it doesn’t mean that it’s automatically ‘healthy.’
  • CBS New York’s Dana Tyler reported that hand sanitizer sales are up 37% over last year, and millions of people use it multiple times a day. The FDA is currently reviewing the ingredients in these products and says right now there is no evidence that hand sanitizers are any more effective than regular soap and water in helping to prevent the spread of germs.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 13th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-childbirth-midwives/u-s-states-with-more-support-for-midwives-have-better-birth-outcomes-idUSKCN1GL2ZI

A recent study suggests that states with laws that make it easier for midwives to care for pregnant women and deliver babies may have better birth outcomes than states where it’s harder for midwives to provide care.

Researchers ranked each state based on how easy it was for midwives to practice and collaborate with obstetricians and other providers. Scores ranged from a low of seventeen in North Carolina to a high of sixty one in Washington, out of one hundred points. Higher scores were associated with significantly higher proportion of babies delivered by midwives, more spontaneous vaginal deliveries and higher rates of breastfeeding. Higher scores were also linked to fewer preterm births, underweight newborns and surgical cesarean section deliveries.
….

Researchers noted in PLoS One that roughly nine in ten U.S. births were handled by physicians in two thousand fifteen, while about nine percent were attended by certified nurse midwives with advanced training or other midwives. Certified nurse midwives can get licensed in all fifty states and can provide well-woman gynecology and primary care as well as maternity care.
….
States with highest scores had licensing requirements for different types of midwives and gave midwives the most ability to care for women in different settings, write prescriptions and receive payments from Medicaid, the U.S. health insurance program for the poor. States in the Northeast, Pacific Northwest and Southwest had the highest density of midwives, as measured by the number of midwives practicing for every one thousand births. States in the South had the lowest scores for midwifery policies, and these states also had the highest rates of premature births, underweight babies and infant mortality.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/03/09/health/vegetarian-fast-food-drayer/index.html

Plant-based diets have been associated with many health benefits, including a reduced risk of obesity, heart disease and Type two diabetes. So it might naturally follow that vegetarian fast food, which is plant-based, would be more nutritionally appealing than its traditional relatives.
….

Sharon Palmer, a registered dietitian and author of “Plant-Powered for Life” said: “Just because a restaurant or fast food menu item says it’s vegetarian or vegan, it doesn’t mean that it’s automatically ‘healthy.’ It can have just as much, if not more, calories, saturated fat and sodium as non-vegetarian options.” After all, ingredients contribute calories, whether plant-based or not. And while fiber and protein can be higher in vegetarian meals, thanks to plentiful amounts of beans, vegetables and whole grains, so can things such as saturated fat and sodium, depending on how the food is prepared and the amount of cheese and condiments a meal contains. Palmer said: “Vegetarian and vegan food options that are deep-fried, covered in cheese or creamy sauces and piled over huge portions of fries, rice, wraps or breads may not be the healthiest option on the menu.”

Veggie Grill’s Fala-Full sandwich has one thousand one hundred calories, ten grams of saturated fat and more than a day’s worth of sodium (two thousand three hundred eight milligrams). That’s more than double the calories, two and half times the sodium and the same amount of saturated fat as a McDonald’s Big Mac.

….
Just because a food is “vegetarian” or “vegan” doesn’t guarantee that it’s a nutritionally superior option. French fries may be vegetarian, but that doesn’t mean they should fill your plate on a regular basis. Palmer recommends looking for options that include plenty of vegetables, such as salads, bowls or wraps; whole grains, such as quinoa or whole-grain bread; and simple protein options, like beans or a veggie burger patty. She also advises “going easy on sauces, creams and cheeses,” which makes good health sense, whether you choose to eat vegetarian or not.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/does-hand-sanitizer-give-people-a-false-sense-of-security/

CBS New York’s Dana Tyler reported that hand sanitizer sales are up thirty seven percent over last year, and millions of people use it multiple times a day.
….
Doctor Suraj Saggar, an Infectious Disease Specialist with Holy Name Medical Center explained that hand sanitizers work by removing the top layer of oil from our hands, taking with it some bacteria and viruses that cause the common cold, strep throat, even the flu. If your hands are dirty, doctors say hand sanitizers will not clean them, and there are certain illnesses hand sanitizers cannot prevent.
….
The Food and Drug Administration is currently reviewing the ingredients in these products and says right now there is no evidence that hand sanitizers are any more effective than regular soap and water in helping to prevent the spread of germs.
….
The American Cleaning Institute, which represents some manufacturers, has said not only are hand sanitizers a critical part of healthy hygiene, the Centers For Disease Control recommends using them when soap and water are not available.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.