The Health News United Kingdom March 15 2018

  • On April 6 the UK will join the small number of countries which have introduced a tax on sugary drinks as part of an anti-obesity policy. Shoppers will pay 18p or 24p per litre extra depending on how much extra sugar has been added to the drink. Rather than waiting to see how customers react to the tax – known officially as the soft drinks industry levy – companies have already started altering their recipes.
  • A new report suggests that prescribing knitting could save the NHS millions of pounds because it lowers blood pressure, reduces depression and slows the onset of dementia.The organisation Knit for Peace carried out a widespread literature review looking at the health benefits of the traditional craft after receiving testimonials from their 15,000 volunteers about how the hobby had improved their lives. They discovered that knitting is as relaxing as yoga, distracts from chronic pain, such as arthritis, boosts wellbeing, brings down blood pressure and keeps the mind sharp.
  • Scientists have discovered a link between a person’s ability to empathise and their genetics. Empathetic people have the ability to understand and share the feelings or experiences of another person. The ability was commonly believed to be something that humans learned during their childhood and was attributed to a person’s environment rather than genetics.  But a new study, looking at 46,000 people, has revealed for the first time that genes play a part in such behaviour.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 15th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43372295

On April six the UK will join the small number of countries which have introduced a tax on sugary drinks as part of an anti-obesity policy. Shoppers will pay eighteen p or twenty four p per litre extra depending on how much extra sugar has been added to the drink.
….
Rather than waiting to see how customers react to the tax – known officially as the soft drinks industry levy – companies have already started altering their recipes. The fine print of Treasury budget documents reveals that the revenue from the levy will be a lot less than was first forecast. The simple explanation is that there will be fewer drinks than anticipated on sale above the threshold for paying the levy.

When the Chancellor at the time George Osborne announced in two thousand sixteen there would be a tax on sugary drinks, the expected revenue was about five hundred million pounds a year. A year later the expected yield had fallen to three hundred eighty five million pounds.
In the Budget documents in November two thousand seventeen the anticipated figure had dropped again to two hundred seventy five million per year from the launch date in April this year.
….
The aim of the policy is to reduce consumption of sugar and if companies can do that by changing drink recipes ahead of the levy taking effect then that, so the argument goes, is a good outcome.
….
Restrictions on TV advertising of high calorie food and supermarket promotions were not included in the strategy.
….
Advertising restrictions are back on the agenda and are being considered – there may be announcements this summer. Food manufacturers have signed up to a voluntary sugar reformulation plan and accepted a calorie reduction target without complaint and that has emboldened ministers.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/03/11/knitting-should-prescribed-nhs-lower-blood-pressure-reduce-depression/

A new report suggests that prescribing knitting could save the NHS millions of pounds because it lowers blood pressure, reduces depression and slows the onset of dementia. The organisation Knit for Peace carried out a widespread literature review looking at the health benefits of the traditional craft after receiving testimonials from their fifteen thousand volunteers about how the hobby had improved their lives.

They discovered that knitting is as relaxing as yoga, distracts from chronic pain, such as arthritis, boosts wellbeing, brings down blood pressure and keeps the mind sharp. It also reduces loneliness and isolation and allows older people to feel as if they are still useful to society. In Britain, the NHS spends more than two billion pounds each year on blood pressure treatments, and around three hundred million pounds on antidepressants. Dementia costs the country twenty six billion pounds while the health service spends billions annually tackling chronic pain.
….
Knit for Peace was founded by the Charities Advisory Trust originally as an income generating project for Hutu and Tutsi widows who had been the victims of the Rwandan genocide and civil war. Through the Good Gifts catalogue people could pay for the women to knit jumpers for orphans. The scheme quickly spread to India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Afghanistan and soon British knitters asked if they could donate their own work to refugees.
….
A study of over seventies by the Mayo Clinic in the US , found that knitting was associated with decreased odds of experiencing mild-cognitive impairment, which increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/empathy-is-related-to-genetics-scientists-claim-a3787791.html

Scientists have discovered a link between a person’s ability to empathise and their genetics.
Empathetic people have the ability to understand and share the feelings or experiences of another person. The ability was commonly believed to be something that humans learned during their childhood and was attributed to a person’s environment rather than genetics.

But a new study, looking at forty six thousand people, has revealed for the first time that genes play a part in such behaviour.  The paper, published in the journal Translational Psychology, also revealed that women are more likely to be empathetic than men. Scientists from the University of Cambridge, who led the study asked participants to take part in a questionnaire and provide samples for DNA testing.

Through analysing the results, the team discovered that at least ten percent of the amount of empathy someone has is down to their genes. Varun Warrier from the University of Cambridge, said :”This is an important step towards understanding the role that genetics plays in empathy.”

The study also found a link between the genetic differences associated with lower empathy and those that pose a higher risk of autism. But the team said more research was needed to be able to find a more definitive and accurate link between genetics and empathy.  And it acknowledged that analysing behaviour through surveys can lead to skewed results.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.