The Health News USA February 14 2018

  • In “Peter Rabbit,” the new Sony Pictures movie based on the children’s book, a family of bunnies fight for access to the infamous Tom McGregor’s backyard. In one scene, Peter Rabbit attacks McGregor where he’s weakest — his allergy to blackberries. After Peter flings a blackberry into McGregor’s mouth, McGregor suffers from anaphylaxis and is forced to use an adrenaline injector. That scene from the surprisingly contentious movie released last Friday has now prompted some parents and allergy awareness organizations to boycott the children’s film and petition for an apology from Sony Pictures.
  • While a nationwide push to get babies to sleep on their backs initially produced steep declines in unexplained and sleep-related infant deaths, U.S. progress against these fatalities has been minimal in recent years. Researchers reported in Pediatric that in 2015 about 92 in every 100,000 babies up to age 12 months died of sleep-related causes like SIDS or accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed or other unknown causes. That’s down from about 155 deaths for every 100,000 babies in 1990.
  • So-called toddler drinks are a growing category of beverages for young ones, but their labels may be misleading customers about their nutrition and health benefits. A study published Monday in the journal Preventive Medicine noted that the drinks — marketed for children nine to thirty nine months who are transitioning from breast or formula feeding to solid foods — are not recommended by medical experts and provide “no advantage” over whole milk and a nutritionally adequate diet, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. Most toddler drinks are typically composed of powdered milk, corn syrup solids or other added caloric sweeteners, and vegetable oil.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/movies/sony-apologizes-peter-rabbit-movie-makes-parents-hopping-mad-n847206

In “Peter Rabbit,” the new Sony Pictures movie based on the children’s book, a family of bunnies fight for access to the infamous Tom McGregor’s backyard. In one scene, Peter Rabbit attacks McGregor where he’s weakest — his allergy to blackberries. After Peter flings a blackberry into McGregor’s mouth, McGregor suffers from anaphylaxis and is forced to use an adrenaline injector. That scene from the surprisingly contentious movie released last Friday has now prompted some parents and allergy awareness organizations to boycott the children’s film and petition for an apology from Sony Pictures.

The classic children’s book “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” on which the movie is based does not include this scene. Immediately after the movie’s release, the group Kids With Food Allergies, a subdivision of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, heard complaints about the scene from parents who condemned the use of allergies as a punchline.

The group took to Facebook to warn parents of a scene they say makes fun of the life-threatening condition, and AAFA president and CEO Kenneth Mendez sent an open letter on Saturday to Sony Pictures Entertainment and Animal Logic, the independent digital studio that partnered on the film. Mendez added: “We strongly urge you to refrain from the type of programming that mocks food allergies in the future.”

Sony Pictures and the “Peter Rabbit” filmmakers apologized in a joint statement on Sunday.
The statement reads: “Food allergies are a serious issue. Our film should not have made light of Peter Rabbit’s arch nemesis, Mister McGregor, being allergic to blackberries, even in a cartoonish, slapstick way. “We sincerely regret not being more aware and sensitive to this issue, and we truly apologize.”

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-infants-sids/u-s-progress-against-sleep-related-infant-deaths-is-stalling-idUSKBN1FW29R

While a nationwide push to get babies to sleep on their backs initially produced steep declines in unexplained and sleep-related infant deaths, U.S. progress against these fatalities has been minimal in recent years. Researchers reported in Pediatric that in two thousand fifteen about ninety two in every one hundred thousand babies up to age twelve months died of sleep-related causes like sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed or other unknown causes. That’s down from about one hundred fifty five deaths for every one hundred thousand babies in nineteen ninety.

But most of this progress occurred before two thousand. Deaths rates plunged by forty five percent from nineteen ninety to nineteen ninety eight and then dipped by just seven percent from nineteen ninety nine to two thousand fifteen .

SIDS has become much less common in recent decades as doctors have urged parents to put infants to sleep on their backs without blankets or other soft bedding and toys that could pose a suffocation risk. But it still remains a leading cause of infant mortality, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. These deaths can be caused by a variety of factors including brain abnormalities or respiratory problems in babies as well as sleeping face down on fluffy surfaces or surfaces that pose a risk of suffocation. To reduce the risk, the AAP recommends that babies sleep in the same room as their parents – but not the same bed – for at least six months and ideally up to one year.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/labels-toddler-drinks-misleading-customers-study/story?id=52973965

So-called toddler drinks are a growing category of beverages for young ones, but their labels may be misleading customers about their nutrition and health benefits. A study published Monday in the journal Preventive Medicine noted that the drinks — marketed for children nine to thirty nine months who are transitioning from breast or formula feeding to solid foods — are not recommended by medical experts and provide “no advantage” over whole milk and a nutritionally adequate diet, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians.

Most toddler drinks are typically composed of powdered milk, corn syrup solids or other added caloric sweeteners, and vegetable oil, according to the study, conducted by researchers at the NYU College of Global Public Health and the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut. They contain more sodium and less protein than whole cow’s milk.

Researchers also said that the drinks’ labeling makes them look like infant formulas, which are subject to more oversight by U.S. food label laws and regulations. According to the press release, the study recommended the Food and Drug Administration “provide guidance or propose regulations to ensure the appropriate labeling of toddler drinks.”

Mardi Mountford, president of the Infant Nutrition Council of America, an association of manufacturers and marketers of formulated nutrition products said: “Formula manufacturers take great pride in offering safe, innovative products based on current advancements in the scientific understanding of infant and toddler nutrition.”

According to the study, what parents feed their infants and toddlers during the transition from exclusive breastfeeding or infant formula to the family diet of solid foods is critical for establishing healthy dietary preferences and preventing obesity in children.

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