The Health News United Kingdom February 27 2018

  • A study by London doctors has revealed that pregnant women with high blood pressure can safely monitor their condition at home and avoid numerous hospital check-ups. About 1 in 10 expectant mothers have hypertension which, in a minority of cases, can lead to preeclampsia. The condition can be life-threatening to mother and child. The app, dubbed HaMpton (Home Monitoring of Hypertension in Pregnancy), has won a Health Service Journal award and been included on a NHS “accelerator” programme advancing the roll-out of new technology.
  • Stephen Fry has announced that he has been diagnosed with prostate cancer. The author and broadcaster released a video recently revealing that he has undergone surgery. In a video posted on his website, he said that he had an operation before Christmas to remove lymph nodes. One in 8 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.
  • Researchers at the University of Oxford wanted to clear up lingering questions about how effective medicine is in treating acute depression in adults. After painstakingly carrying out trials involving nearly 120,000 people, including patients taking 21 commonly prescribed antidepressants, the researchers found that all of the drugs were more effective than a placebo. According to the World Health Organisation, depression affects around 300 million people across the world.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 27th of February 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/blood-pressure-app-made-by-london-doctors-cuts-need-for-pregnant-women-to-visit-hospital-a3774201.html

A study by London doctors has revealed that pregnant women with high blood pressure can safely monitor their condition at home and avoid numerous hospital check-ups. About one in ten expectant mothers have hypertension which, in a minority of cases, can lead to preeclampsia. The condition can be life-threatening to mother and child.

Medics at Saint George’s hospital in Tooting developed a smartphone app which they trialled with one hundred eight women. They gave them all a blood pressure cuff to use at home, and asked them to record the results in the app. Results just published, in the journal Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, found women who used the app were no worse off than fifty eight other mothers who were monitored in clinic.

Lead author Professor Asma Khalil said: “It is time to use existing technology in order to improve the way we look after pregnant women.” The app, dubbed HaMpton (Home Monitoring of Hypertension in Pregnancy), has won a Health Service Journal award and been included on a NHS “accelerator” programme advancing the roll-out of new technology.

It is set to be used in other hospitals, including Croydon, Royal Surrey, East Surrey and possibly Northwick Park and North Middlesex. The app saved the NHS two hundred seventy eight pounds a week per patient – the equivalent to forty four million pounds a year if rolled out across the country. Patients having blood pressure checks often experience “white coat syndrome”, where their ratings are artificially high because of the experience of being in hospital.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/02/23/stephen-fry-reveals-battle-prostate-cancer/

Stephen Fry has announced that he has been diagnosed with prostate cancer. The author and broadcaster released a video recently revealing that he has undergone surgery. In a video posted on his website, he said that he had an operation before Christmas to remove lymph nodes. He said he had been told by doctors that “it’s all been got”.
….
He described the cancer as “an aggressive little bugger” but said he is now clear: “At the moment I’m fit and well and happy.” Fry, sixty, discovered he had cancer after visiting his doctor for a flu jab. The doctor suggested he have a general check-up, which revealed that his PSA (prostate specific antigen) levels were high. He then had an MRI scan and a biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis.

One in eight men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. Fry said: “I felt my life was saved by early intervention so I would urge any of you men of a certain age to get your PSA levels checked.”

http://metro.co.uk/2018/02/22/antidepressants-effective-treating-mental-health-major-study-finds-7332653/

Researchers at the University of Oxford wanted to clear up lingering questions about how effective medicine is in treating acute depression in adults. After painstakingly carrying out trials involving nearly one hundred twenty thousand people, including patients taking twenty one commonly prescribed antidepressants, the researchers found that all of the drugs were more effective than a placebo.

The analysis of more than five hundred trials did find that some medications worked better than others, however. It has been suggested that more than a million people per year in the UK should be given access to treatment for depression, through either drugs or talking therapies, with scientists saying the study proves that the drugs do work.

Andrea Cipriani, from Oxford’s Department of Psychiatry said: “Under-treated depression is a huge problem and we need to be aware of that. “Among the drugs found to be more effective were amitriptyline, mirtazapine and sertraline, while fluoxetine – more widely known as Prozac – was considered one of the least effective.

According to the World Health Organisation, depression affects around three hundred million people across the world. NHS Digital statistics revealed last year that the number of prescriptions for antidepressants went up from fifty nine point five million to almost sixty three point six million between October two thousand fifteen and September two thousand sixteen.

Other treatments for depression include talking therapies such as cognitive behavioural therapy and counselling.

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