The Health News Australia March 2 2018

  • A new report shows the most common bacterial cause of bloodstream infections in Australia is becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. A report warns that the widespread and unnecessary use of antibiotics has put Australians at risk of life-threatening sepsis infections caused by superbug E.coli. Analysis of surveillance data, released by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows the bacterium E.coli is the most common bacterial cause of bloodstream infections, otherwise known as sepsis, in Australia and has become more resistant to the antibiotics doctors rely on to treat it.
  • New figures show the number of people living with dementia in Australia continues to rise. The latest data from Dementia Australia indicates more than 425,000 people live with it and an estimated 2,050 Australians develop dementia every day. The organisation says it uses the term develop, not diagnose, because many cases go undiagnosed.
  • Researchers comparing the use of two drugs for pregnant women who do not go into labour shortly after their waters break have found both are reasonable options. University of Queensland researcher Dr. Kassam Mahomed compared intravenous oxytocin infusion to prostaglandin gel for women who chose to have their labour induced. Abnormal foetal heart rate was recorded in 4.4% of labours induced by prostaglandin, compared to 12.8% for oxytocin.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 2nd of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://healthtimes.com.au/hub/infection-control/33/news/aap/report-warns-superbug-ecoli-driving-australia-sepsis-rates/3202/

A new report shows the most common bacterial cause of bloodstream infections in Australia is becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. A report warns that the widespread and unnecessary use of antibiotics has put Australians at risk of life-threatening sepsis infections caused by superbug Escherichia coli or E.coli.

Analysis of surveillance data, released by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, shows the bacterium E.coli is the most common bacterial cause of bloodstream infections, otherwise known as sepsis, in Australia and has become more resistant to the antibiotics doctors rely on to treat it. The Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance Sepsis Outcomes Programs: two thousand sixteen report states E.coli accounted for thirty seven percent of the total eleven thousand one hundred sixty three cases of bacterial sepsis reported over the year.

Of those, an increasing number had become less susceptible to the antibiotics used to treat them, with nearly one in eight (twelve point seven percent) susceptible to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin.
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Professor John Turnidge, Senior Medical Advisor for the Commission’s AURA Surveillance System says Australia is losing the battle against E.coli.
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E.coli is a bug that lives in the gut and most of the time is harmless. Professor Turnidge said that most commonly it is responsible for a urinary tract infection but can also cause kidney infection and this is when patients are at high risk of it reaching the bloodstream.
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Professor Turnidge, the commission’s senior medical advisor, said this drug-resistant E.coli is a growing threat and the overuse of antibiotics needs to be taken seriously by everyone.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-28/new-figures-show-250-australians-developing-dementia-every-day/9490840

New figures show the number of people living with dementia in Australia continues to rise. The latest data from Dementia Australia indicates more than four hundred twenty five thousand people live with it and an estimated two thousand fifty Australians develop dementia every day.
The organisation says it uses the term develop, not diagnose, because many cases go undiagnosed.

The organisation’s chief executive Maree McCabe says she wants families and those living with dementia to know there are services that can help them. She said:  “By two thousand fifty six without a medical breakthrough, we’ll have around one point one million [people living with dementia] and there won’t be anybody in Australia who won’t be impacted in some way.”

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Isabelle Burke was just twenty when her then fifty four-year-old mother Christine O’Brien was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in two thousand fourteen.
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Miss O’Brien is now in an aged-care facility but her daughter is the first point of contact if anything goes wrong and visits her mum almost daily. Miss Burke and her siblings have accessed family counselling services through Dementia Australia, to help talk about their mum’s condition, and she encourages others to do the same.

http://health.uq.edu.au/article/2018/02/labour-inducing-drugs-put-test

Researchers comparing the use of two drugs for pregnant women who do not go into labour shortly after their waters break have found both are reasonable options. University of Queensland researcher Doctor Kassam Mahomed compared intravenous oxytocin infusion to prostaglandin gel for women who chose to have their labour induced.

Doctor Mahomed said oxytocin usually brought on contractions quickly and therefore they tended to be more painful, whereas prostaglandin allowed for gradual onset of contractions.
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Researchers conducted a randomised trial involving one hundred eighty four women, and found fifty three percent of induced labours from the prostaglandin regimen did not require any oxytocin to speed up contractions. Doctor Mahomed said: “This was particularly evident in women with more than one child, with sixty seven percent not requiring any oxytocin.”

Abnormal foetal heart rate was recorded in four point four percent of labours induced by prostaglandin, compared to twelve point eight per cent for oxytocin.

However, the oxytocin group reported greater satisfaction with the method used (eighty three percent compared to sixty nine percent); labour pains starting as they would have liked (seventy one percent compared to fifty seven percent); and the time it took to start labour (70 per cent compared to forty four percent).

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