The Health News Australia October 4 2017

  • Bed bug populations have exploded all over the world, particularly in Australia where some estimate there has been a 5,000% increase since 2000. A team of researchers from the University of Sheffield have been trying to figure out why the insects have been proliferating, and what could be done to limit their spread
  • A national surveillance report provides an overview of annually-updated data and analyses from relevant programs. This covers drug consumption in participating hospitals, appropriateness of use in participating hospitals, and prescribing data from general practitioners and residential aged-care facilities.
  • Mining billionaire and anti-cancer campaigner Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest says that the legal smoking age should be raised to twenty one to cut the profits of “big tobacco”. The Eliminate Cancer Initiative is an organisation funded by Mister Forrest and wife Nicola, to take on the tobacco industry and aims to pursue legal action and push for legislation change.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 4th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-29/dont-want-bed-bugs-then-do-your-washing-say-scientists/8999580

Bed bug populations have exploded all over the world, particularly in Australia where some estimate there has been a five thousand percent increase since two thousand.
A team of researchers from the University of Sheffield have been trying to figure out why the insects have been proliferating, and what could be done to limit their spread.

Behavioural ecologist Doctor William Hentley, whose research paper on the topic was published in Scientific Reports, said two major changes appear to have led to the current problem.
“The increase in bed bug numbers around the world seems to have correlated with the reduction in really harmful pesticides, and also the increase in cheap global travel,” he said.
He added that their findings suggested that dirty laundry could be behind the recent bed bugs spread.
….
Insecticides nearly wiped out bed bugs last century, but the little beasts survived and are now thriving. Doctor Hentley said his team’s finding suggested bugs do not need a human host to thrive, as has long been the belief. Initially the team thought the amount of carbon dioxide in a room would affect the results — the carbon dioxide would represent a human’s breath as they exhale, which many bugs are attracted to.

However, that was not the case, which convinced the researchers that bed bugs could hitch a ride in luggage containing dirty laundry. Wash your clothes regularly, or seal up your clothes.
Bed bugs are small parasitic insects that feed on human blood by piercing the skin. Bed bugs can survive for more than six months between blood meals. The current crop of bed bugs is highly resistant to the insecticides we currently use. Experts at stowing away in the seams and folds of luggage, overnight bags and folded clothes, bed bugs are often transported to different places and different countries by travellers. They can live up to six months at room temperature and can survive for long periods of time without a blood meal. If you want to check before sleeping, look for them in the folds of mattresses along the stitched edges, on bed frames, in bedside furniture, in picture frames, behind wall paper, and any other cracks or crevices that could protect them.

https://theconversation.com/drug-resistance-how-we-keep-track-of-whether-antibiotics-are-being-used-responsibly-82446

A national surveillance report provides an overview of annually-updated data and analyses from relevant programs. This covers drug consumption in participating hospitals, appropriateness of use in participating hospitals, and prescribing data from general practitioners and residential aged-care facilities.

The National Antimicrobial Prescribing Survey or NAPS is unique, in that it assesses the quality of individual patient prescriptions. This means it looks at whether prescriptions were compliant with clinical practice guidelines for the given indications (including drug choice and dose), and whether the overall drug use was appropriate and safe. In two thousand thirteen to two thousand fourteen, one hundred fifty one hospitals (one hundred thirty two public and nineteen private) from all states and territories participated in the NAPS. From that, twelve thousand eight hundred prescriptions for antimicrobial drugs were analysed. In two thousand fifteen to sixteen, two thousand eighty one hospitals (two hundred thirteen public and sixty eight private) participated in the audit, and twenty two thousand twenty one prescriptions for antimicrobial drugs were analysed. In two thousand fifteen, on average, forty percent of patients in hospitals were administered an antibiotic. Of these, seventy two percent were found to have needed them as they were prescribed, and thirty five percent had a review- or stop-date documented.
….
There are complex reasons why therapeutic drugs, including antibiotics, are sometimes inappropriately prescribed. These can include institutional or systemic cultures that have been in place for a long time. Knowledge gaps are an issue. Despite access to good-quality prescribing guidelines in hospitals, guidelines may not be consulted frequently. The fear of missing infections or adverse outcomes may contribute to excessive or inappropriate treatment. Sometimes, a lack of resources means staff don’t have the time to review a diagnosis and adjust treatments in a timely way. Some staff may recognise inappropriate use but are fearful about speaking up or contradicting another doctor.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/smoking-age-should-be-raised-to-21-years-says-mining-magnate-andrew-forrest/news-story/115a0c3f20bd47e262dfd2636356dc76

Mining billionaire and anti-cancer campaigner Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest says that the legal smoking age should be raised to twenty one to cut the profits of “big tobacco”. The Eliminate Cancer Initiative is an organisation funded by Mister Forrest and wife Nicola, to take on the tobacco industry and aims to pursue legal action and push for legislation change. Mister Forrest said “We need to stop fuelling big tobacco preying on our vulnerable youth.” Federal and state governments should stop young people from smoking until they are at least twenty one, he added. Almost ninety percent of adult smokers first start the habit as children and the law needed to be changed to address the issue.

….
Tobacco companies needed to be held account financially for the suffering they cause to Australians, Mister Forrest said. Part of the seventy five million funding the ECI received from the Forrests will be used to launch a legal “assault” against tobacco companies.

The ECI is funded by the Minderoo Foundation and aims to help accelerate cancer research, improve prevention detection and treatment options including access to clinical trials.

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