The Health News United Kingdom March 6 2018

  • NHS England has said that the NHS plans to cut prostate cancer diagnosis times from 6 weeks to a matter of days. Currently a test for men with prostate cancer requires a magnetic resonance imaging scan and a biopsy where a dozen samples are taken, requiring multiple hospital visits. But a new “one-stop” service will be trialled in 3 west London hospitals which hopes to complete all the necessary tests in 1 day.
  • The NHS is set to launch a nationwide scheme to treat military veterans with mental health issues. The Veterans’ Mental Health Complex Treatment Service was designed after former military personnel and their families across England were asked by the NHS how services could be improved. However, some veterans have raised concerns that the money will take funds away from existing charity schemes. The new service, backed by £3.2 million of funding, will help those who have the most complex needs, including substance misuse and trauma.
  • When Cancer Research this week revealed that millennials are set to become the most overweight generation since records began, there was a key message – after smoking, obesity is the second biggest cause of cancer. It called for a ban on junk food advertising and urged people to eat healthier, more balanced diets. But not everyone appreciated the tone of the message. Cancer Research said it never intended to blame people for being overweight.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 6th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43271628

NHS England has said that the NHS plans to cut prostate cancer diagnosis times from six weeks to a matter of days. Currently a test for men with prostate cancer requires a magnetic resonance imaging scan and a biopsy where a dozen samples are taken, requiring multiple hospital visits.

But a new “one-stop” service will be trialled in three west London hospitals which hopes to complete all the necessary tests in one day. NHS England CEO Simon Stevens said the programme was “world-leading”. A new MRI scan, known as an mpMRI, provides higher quality imagery and provides up to forty percent of patients with a same day diagnosis.

For people who need a biopsy, ultrasound images with threeD MRI scans are used to target areas for taking tissue samples. The NHS claims the technique virtually eliminates the threat of sepsis. The new technique is being trialled at Charing Cross Hospital, Epsom Hospital and Queen Mary’s Hospital in Roehampton, where about five thousand men will be tested over the next two years.
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Consultant radiologist Doctor Anthony Chambers said that although he wished the researchers well he had reservations as to whether carrying out the mpMRI and biopsy on the same day was the right way forward. He said this could lead to an over-investigation of men who have a common infection called prostatitis rather than prostate cancer.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/04/nhs-launch-national-scheme-treat-veterans-mental-health/

The NHS is set to launch a nationwide scheme to treat military veterans with mental health issues. The Veterans’ Mental Health Complex Treatment Service was designed after former military personnel and their families across England were asked by the NHS how services could be improved. However, some veterans have raised concerns that the money will take funds away from existing charity schemes.

Veterans told the Portsmouth News that an intensive treatment programme for people with post-traumatic stress disorder provided in the area by charity Combat Stress would be cut and that some veterans who struggled with mental health problems were reluctant to go to the NHS.

The charity’s chief executive Sue Freeth told the newspaper that intensive treatment plans would need to be funded by donations, but reassured veterans that it would continue to provide residential intensive treatment.  A spokesman for NHS England confirmed that placements at that Combat Stress facility were being “tapered off as is usual when a provider reaches the end of a contract”.
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A spokesman for charity PTSD Resolution told the Sunday Telegraph that it “welcomes any initiative that increases the opportunity for veterans to access proper and effective psychotherapeutic help” but added that “access to therapy should not be confined to a single choice of pathway”. The new service, backed by three point two million pounds of funding, will help those who have the most complex needs, including substance misuse and trauma.
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43240986

When Cancer Research this week revealed that millennials are set to become the most overweight generation since records began, there was a key message – after smoking, obesity is the second biggest cause of cancer. It called for a ban on junk food advertising and urged people to eat healthier, more balanced diets. But not everyone appreciated the tone of the message.

The award-winning Danish comedian Sofie Hagen, who lives in London and has written for the BBC about her social anxiety, took to Twitter to criticise the campaign, which she said was “incredibly damaging”. While the health risks of obesity – such as increased risk of cancer and other diseases – are rarely disputed among most doctors, some experts and campaigners think the way weight is talked about should change.

Doctor Stuart Flint, a senior research fellow in public health and obesity at Leeds Beckett University, said overweight people were routinely discriminated against and stigmatised – or “fat shamed” – in the media, school, the workplace and even by health professionals.

Critics have accused the movement of “normalising” obesity.
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Tam Fry, spokesman for the National Obesity Forum, a charity that campaigns to raise awareness of the health dangers of obesity, agreed that body shaming was harmful and ineffective at getting people to lose weight. But he said it was important that doctors should feel comfortable about telling people they are overweight.

Cancer Research said it never intended to blame people for being overweight.

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