The Health News USA March 5 2018

  • U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams has announced recently that housing is the best way to help recovering opioid addicts stay on the path to recovery. The president held a two-hour summit Thursday on the opioid epidemic ranging from health and treatment to enforcement of drug laws. The meeting made headlines when Mister Trump seemed to suggest allowing the death penalty for drug dealers.
  • Despite known risks to both mom and her unborn baby, 1 in 14 women who gave birth in the U.S. in 2016 said they smoked while they were pregnant, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Findings, released on Wednesday and based on information on birth certificates reported by moms themselves, found that 7% of all expectant mothers smoked.
  • A US study suggests that military women who give birth within 6 months of returning from deployment are twice as likely to have premature babies compared to other soldiers. Researchers examined data on 12,877 births to U.S. soldiers from 2011 to 2014 and found that, overall, 6.1% percent of these deliveries were premature.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/mar/2/jerome-adams-surgeon-general-said-top-priority-in-/

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams has announced recently that housing is the best way to help recovering opioid addicts stay on the path to recovery. Doctor Adams told Fox News:“We know that housing is health. The number one predictor for recovery is having stable and supportive housing.”

He said President Trump is committed to tackling the opioid epidemic and asked Doctor Adams to focus on the health aspects of the issue. Doctor Adams said he’s working to show people how to help those physically suffering from an overdose before emergency medical help arrives. The surgeon general said saving lives is the top priority for the Trump administration and showed how naloxone, which can be sprayed in the nose or injected, can help reverse an overdose and keep the person alive.
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The president held a two-hour summit Thursday on the opioid epidemic ranging from health and treatment to enforcement of drug laws. The meeting made headlines when Mister Trump seemed to suggest allowing the death penalty for drug dealers. More specific policies on the issue are expected to come in the following weeks.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/u-s-women-smoke-pregnant-article-1.3846845

Despite known risks to both mom and her unborn baby, one in fourteen women who gave birth in the U.S. in two thousand sixteen said they smoked while they were pregnant, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Findings, released on Wednesday and based on information on birth certificates reported by moms themselves, found that seven percent of all expectant mothers smoked.

Even though it’s well-established that cigarette smoking during pregnancy has been associated with low birthweight, preterm birth and various birth defects. Puffing tobacco differed by various factors, including age, education and location. Women aged twenty to twenty four were most likely to smoke cigarettes during pregnancy at ten point seven percent, while those over forty five were least likely at two point zero percent.

At twelve point two percent, the odds of smoking were highest among women with a high school diploma or General Equivalency Diploma and at zero point four percent lowest for women with a master’s degree or higher. At twenty five point one percent, West Virginia had the most moms-to-be that smoked. At one point six percent, California had that fewest. New York and New Jersey each had a prevalence of less than five percent.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-pregnancy-soldiers/recent-return-from-deployment-tied-to-preterm-births-for-military-women-idUSKCN1GE2T1

A US study suggests that military women who give birth within six months of returning from deployment are twice as likely to have premature babies compared to other soldiers. Researchers examined data on twelve thousand eight hundred seventy seven births to U.S. soldiers from two thousand eleven to two thousand fourteen and found that, overall, six point one percent of these deliveries were premature.

But for mothers who had returned from deployment within the past six months,  eleven point seven percent of deliveries were premature, versus just five point nine percent of births to mothers who had completed their deployments more than six months earlier.

Lead study author Doctor Jonathan Shaw of Stanford University School of Medicine in California said: “Active duty soldiers, including those in this study, tend to be a group of younger, fit, adults – a population that is generally free of the health issues and chronic diseases that might lead to complicated pregnancies and premature onset of labor.”
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Pregnancy normally lasts about forty weeks, and babies born after thirty seven weeks are considered full term. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in ten babies born in the U.S. are premature.  In the weeks immediately after birth, preemies often have difficulty breathing and digesting food. They can also encounter longer-term challenges such as impaired vision, hearing and cognitive skills, as well as social and behavioral problems.

At a time when more women are serving in the military and combat roles for them are expanding, little research to date has looked at the effects of service on reproductive health, the study authors note in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The study found that deployment on its own didn’t appear to make a big difference in the chances of a preterm delivery when women delivered more than six months after they returned.

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