The Health News United Kingdom April 13 2018

  • New figures show that hospitals are spending as little as £3 day on food for patients, despite rising numbers of cases of malnutrition. Data reveals 13 trusts spending less than five pounds a day on food, with just £2.61 a day spent by one NHS hospital – little more than the daily spend in prisons. Labour has pledged to introduce new legal minimum standard for hospital food, to ensure patients were better nourished.
  • Inspectors say that some of the failings that allowed rogue surgeon Ian Paterson to harm patients have been found to be widespread across private hospitals. The Care Quality Commission said it was concerned about the “old-fashioned” approach to consultants which led to a lack of monitoring and checks. The regulator said it meant there was a “real danger” poor practices were not being picked up or challenged. Private hospitals said they were responding quickly to the findings.
  • Underpaid, short-staffed and sick with stress – staff at Birmingham’s hospitals are increasingly feeling the strain. According to the latest NHS Staff Survey results, one in seven members of staff at Walsall Healthcare (15.2 %) said they rarely or never look forward to going to work, while it was one in eight (13.1%) at both Heart of England and the Dudley Group.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 13th of April 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/04/12/hospitals-spending-just-3-day-patients-meals/

New figures show that hospitals are spending as little as three pounds a day on food for patients, despite rising numbers of cases of malnutrition. Data reveals thirteen trusts spending less than five pounds a day on food, with just two pounds and sixty one p a day spent by one NHS hospital – little more than the daily spend in prisons. Labour has pledged to introduce new legal minimum standard for hospital food, to ensure patients were better nourished.

Records show the number of patients admitted to hospital suffering from malnutrition has more than doubled since two thousand nine and two thousand ten, with eight thousand four hundred fifty eight cases where it was the primary or secondary diagnosis in two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen.
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The NHS data shows widespread variation in spending on food, with some trusts stating their daily costs as forty pounds per patient per day. However, such figures were likely to include food transport and other catering costs, such as staff pay. Labour’s new analysis of official hospital food data shows five hundred sixty million pounds spent on one hundred forty four million inpatient main meals in two thousand sixteen and two thousand seventeen – an average of three point sixty eight pounds per meal.
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According to the Office of National Statistics, malnutrition was the underlying cause or a contributory factor in three hundred fifty one deaths in NHS hospitals in England and Wales in two thousand sixteen.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43673897

Inspectors say that some of the failings that allowed rogue surgeon Ian Paterson to harm patients have been found to be widespread across private hospitals. The Care Quality Commission said it was concerned about the “old-fashioned” approach to consultants which led to a lack of monitoring and checks. The regulator said it meant there was a “real danger” poor practices were not being picked up or challenged. Private hospitals said they were responding quickly to the findings.

The CQC looked at two hundred six private hospitals in what was the first comprehensive review of the sector. These sites treat both private patients and those given NHS funding to be seen privately. The CQC rated seventy percent as good or excellent. But it said there was a “significant concern” relating to governance and safety.

In particular, it highlighted the lack of proper checks and monitoring of senior doctors, mainly surgeons, to ensure they were only undertaking treatments they were qualified to do or carrying them out in a safe way.

It likened the failures to those found in the Paterson case, the breast surgeon who was found guilty of seventeen counts of wounding with intent last year and sentenced to twenty years in jail. He carried out botched operations on patients at private hospitals in the West Midlands.

The surgeon’s trial heard he had wildly exaggerated his patients’ cancer symptoms, leading them to have several needless operations which left them scarred for life physically and emotionally.
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Doctor Howard Freeman, of the NHS Partners Network, which represents private providers, said providing safe and high-quality care was a “top priority”. He said where inspectors had highlighted problems hospitals were being “quick to respond”.

https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/health/underpaid-short-staffed-sick-stress-14512688

Underpaid, short-staffed and sick with stress – staff at Birmingham’s hospitals are increasingly feeling the strain. According to the latest NHS Staff Survey results, one in seven members of staff at Walsall Healthcare (fifteen point two percent) said they rarely or never look forward to going to work, while it was one in eight (thirteen point one percent) at both Heart of England and the Dudley Group.

Bodies representing NHS staff have said the latest survey should act as a warning to the Government that staff are working under “impossible conditions” and that their goodwill and dedication could not be “a replacement for adequate funding and proper workforce planning”.
When asked if there was enough staff at the organisation for them to do their job properly, several trusts in the area saw more than half of staff disagreeing – fifty four point eight percent at Walsall Healthcare, fifty one point eight percent at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s, and fifty one point four percent at the Dudley Group. More than two-fifths of staff at some trusts said they had felt unwell due to work-related stress in two thousand seventeen, including forty three point one at Sandwell and West Birmingham, forty two percent at Walsall Healthcare, and forty point seven percent at the Dudley Group.

Approximately one point one million NHS employees in England were invited to participate in the survey between September two thousand seventeen and November two thousand seventeen, with staff sent a paper questionnaire or an email containing a link to an online questionnaire. The results show that for staff at acute trusts, one in nine (eleven point two percent) rarely or never look forward to going to work, up from ten point eight percent in two thousand sixteen, while forty six point nine percent said there was not enough staff in their organisation for them to do their job properly, up from forty six point two percent.

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