The Health News Australia September 18 2017

Overview

  • Australia, despite its large-scale public awareness efforts, has failed to improve its mental health state – 1 in every 5 Australians has a mental illness or substance abuse disorder.  
  • Sa Health Minister Jack Snelling has quit Cabinet less than two weeks after the opening of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH) and will resign as a MP at the March election.
  • Excessive hours of sitting to watch TV has been linked to an increased risk of dying from inflammatory diseases like Alzheimer’s and diabetes, study suggests.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 18th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/09/15/public-awareness-has-failed-to-improve-australias-mental-health_a_23209824/

A large-scale global health study has found that one in every five Australians has a mental illness or substance abuse disorder.  And while we are world-leaders in treating heart disease, stroke and cancer and our life expectancy is one of the highest in the world, as a nation we’re failing to improve our mental health. These are among the findings of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study for two thousand sixteen, published in The Lancet on Friday. The study is the largest and most comprehensive analysis of health and life expectancy globally, covering more than one hundred thirty countries. It found that one point one billion people globally have a mental illness, affecting all nationalities regardless of socioeconomic status. One point one billion people people worldwide have a mental illness while in Australia, it’s one in five.
In Australia, the top five causes of premature death are: heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, self-harm and Alzheimer’s.Worldwide, treatment for mental illnesses remain low, but even in countries where treatment rates have improved, the prevalence of common mental disorders like depression has changed little.

And Australia is no exception, co-founder of the study, University of Melbourne Laureate Professor Alan Lopez, told HuffPost Australia. He added: “We don’t seem to be making much improvement in reducing the burden of mental illness in Australia. It seems to have been relatively stable over the last two or three decades.” Australians are living longer than ever, outlived only by the populations of Japan, Switzerland and Spain. But we’re also spending more of those extra years sick or disabled, the Global Burden of Disease study indicated. The average Australian man born in two thousand sixteen will live to the age of eighty, but around a decade of that will be spent in ill-health or with a disability. For women, the picture is even worse — they will live, on average, to eighty four point six, but just seventy two of those years will be spent in good health.And mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, bipolar, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and drug and alcohol abuse disorders are a huge reason for that, accounting for almost a quarter of the total number of years spent in ill-health by Australians.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-17/sa-health-minister-jack-snelling-resigns-from-cabinet/8954530

South Australia Health Minister Jack Snelling has quit Cabinet less than two weeks after the opening of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH) and will resign as a MP at the March election. Mister Snelling held a press conference to explain that after twenty years in Parliament, it was time to retire and be “emotionally more available to his children”.

“I’ve always done my best to make sure that I provide the time with them, but in a portfolio like health, you can’t help but be distracted and sometimes, dare I say it, a little grumpy with the family in a way they don’t deserve,” he said.

Mister Snelling was first appointed to the Labor Ministry in March two thousand ten and served as Treasurer between two thousand eleven to two thousand thirteen before becoming the Health Minister in two thousand thirteen.He was elected to State Parliament in  nineteen ninety seven as the Member for Playford, which covers suburbs in Adelaide’s north. Mister Snelling has overseen the Government’s controversial Transforming Health reform of the city’s medical services and facilities. It included the building of the two point three billion dollar new Royal Adelaide Hospital, which is the most expensive building in Australia. Mister Snelling is also the Minister for Health Industries and Minister for the Arts. The Government will hold a Cabinet meeting and reshuffle on Monday.

http://www.9news.com.au/health/2017/09/18/00/07/binge-watching-tv-linked-to-disease-study

According to an Australian study, excessive hours of sitting to watch TV has been linked to an increased risk of dying from inflammatory diseases like Alzheimer’s and diabetes. The study of more than eight thousand nine hundred adults, published in the journal of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, found each additional hour of TV viewing was associated with a twelve percent increased risk of inflammatory-related death. Those who spent more than four hours a day watching TV were at greatest risk. Inflammatory diseases cover a vast array of disorders and conditions that are characterised by inflammation, including kidney disease, diabetes, asthma and Alzheimer’s disease. Lead investigator at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Doctor Megan Grace says while more research is needed the findings build on growing evidence about the negative impact prolonged sitting has on health.

Researchers at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute quizzed adult participants about the viewing habits via a questionnaire between nineteen ninety nine and two thousand. They were categorised into three groups based on their TV viewing habits; less than two hours, greater than two hours but less than four hours; and more than four hours. At the twelve-year follow-up, nine hundred nine people had died. Of these deaths, one hundred thirty were inflammatory-related, and one hundred seventy two non-inflammatory related.

According to the authors, those who watched more than four hours of TV a day had a two-fold risk of dying from an inflammatory disease compared to those who watched two hours. Those who spent more time watching TV were older, less likely to have completed at least 12 years of education, had lower household income and were more likely to be smokers, the authors noted.

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