The Health News United Kingdom August 25 2017

Overview

  • King Edward VII’s hospital, the private hospital used the British royal family was ordered by health inspectors to improve patient safety. The hospital was found to have a shortage of emergency breathing equipment, a “backlog” of six hundred seventy one  incomplete investigations into patient incidents and no medical records of outpatients.
  • A major study warns that patients are 14% more likely to die on wards with just 2 extra cases per nurse. The research by Southampton University found far higher death risks in understaffed hospitals.
  • The non-invasive technique is able to indicate whether plaques in carotid arteries, which supply the brain with blood, are rich in cholesterol and likely to become clogged. The new MRI-style technique was developed to differentiate between the risky plaques that contain a lot of cholesterol and those that are more stable.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 25th of August 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/health/revealed-safety-fears-at-hospital-used-by-the-royal-family-a3618206.html

According to the Standard, the private hospital used by the royal family (King Edward VII’s hospital) was today ordered by health inspectors to improve patient safety. The hospital was found to have a shortage of emergency breathing equipment, a “backlog” of six hundred seventy one  incomplete investigations into patient incidents and no medical records of outpatients.  There were concerns about its senior managers, the “lack of oversight” of its two hundred thirty three consultants and the failure of some doctors to follow basic “bare below the elbow” rules on infection control. The hospital was rated as “requires improvement” by the Care Quality Commission — the second lowest of four possible scores — and served with two formal “requirement notices” after breaching regulations.  King Edward’s, which has been used in recent years by the Queen, Prince Philip and the Duchess of Cambridge.

In the year to last September, one hundred eighty one clinical incidents were reported. Of these, one hundred twenty one resulted in no harm, thirty nine in minimal harm, seventeen in short-term harm and four in death. A total of eight deaths were reported to the Care Quality Commission. There were twenty eight patient falls, a comparatively high number.  Surgery was rated “requires improvement” as the medicines cabinet was regularly left unlocked. The hospital was rated as “requires improvement” for safety and in terms of being “well-led”. It was rated “good” for caring and the effectiveness of its services. Prince Philip spent two nights at the hospital in June with an infection. He has received care there several times. The Queen was admitted in two thousand thirteen with gastroenteritis — her first hospital stay in almost a decade. It was also where the Duchess of Cambridge was treated for severe morning sickness in two thousand twelve. The hospital stated: “King Edward VII’s hospital places the delivery of the highest standards of medical and nursing care to patients as our priority.’’

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/23/every-extra-patient-nurses-caseload-increases-death-risks/

Patients are fourteen percent more likely to die on wards with just two extra cases per nurse, a major study warns. The research by Southampton University found far higher death risks in understaffed hospitals. The average hospital has around eight patients per nurse, but some have to cope with as many as eighteen patients at a time, the study shows.

The research, involving thirty one NHS trusts, found that every extra patient on a nurse’s caseload increased mortality rates by seven percent. It found that short-staffing meant that crucial tasks – such as administering medicines, and detecting that patients were deteriorating – went undone. The study follows repeated warnings of shortages of nurses, with forty thousand vacancies and fewer nurses coming to work in the UK from elsewhere in Europe since the vote on Brexit. According to Janet Davies, chief executive of the Royal College of Nursing, despite years of warnings, hospitals across the country do not have enough nurses. This research puts beyond doubt that patients pay the very highest price when the Government permits nursing on the cheap. Jane Ball, principal research fellow at the University of Southampton, said the study showed that that lack of time is the “missing link” in understanding why mortality rates vary between hospitals. The research, published in the International Journal of Nursing Studies, shows that when registered nursing (RN) levels are lower, necessary care is more likely to be missed. Each ten percent increase in the amount of care left undone was associated with a sixteen per cent increase in the likelihood of a patient dying following common surgery, the study found.

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/844957/stroke-test-mri-scan-predicts-fatal-risk

The non-invasive technique is able to indicate whether plaques in carotid arteries, which supply the brain with blood, are rich in cholesterol and likely to become clogged. The rupture of fatty plaques can block arteries and cause debilitating and life-threatening strokes as the brain is starved of oxygen. At present, risk is measured by the size of the plaque in the carotid artery.If a plaque is deemed to be too big it is surgically removed but the method can miss fatty plaques that are not big, but still carry a high risk of rupturing.

The new MRI-style technique was developed to differentiate between the risky plaques that contain a lot of cholesterol and those that are more stable. In a world-first British researchers used the scan to measure the amount of cholesterol in the carotid plaques of  twenty six patients scheduled for surgery. After they were removed they looked at the actual cholesterol content in each plaque and found the new technique was accurate with the more cholesterol detected, the greater the risk.
The collaboration between researchers at the University of Oxford and surgeons working at the city’s John Radcliffe Hospital was supported by the British Heart Foundation.

….
The team have confirmed and extended their findings in another study on fifty people. There are more than one hundred thousand strokes in the UK each year, around a quarter of which are caused by carotid plaques. Latest figures show stroke costs the UK healthcare system an estimated two billion pounds every year.

Liked it? Take a second to support healthprofessionalradio on Patreon!

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.