The Health News United Kingdom September 14 2017

Overview

  • North Yorkshire Police is planning to expand training in dealing with incidents involving mental health issues to all front line staff.
  • Researchers studied a group of 110 university students in order to assess their meals, calories consumed, and their timing against sleep, activity and body fat. The best way to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is to eat a balanced diet high in fruit and vegetables and low in saturated fat and sugars, and to get regular exercise.
  • According to research published the online journal BMJ Open, people with disabilities in the UK face major hurdles accessing healthcare. Disabled women are particularly disadvantaged.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 14th of  September 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-york-north-yorkshire-41227418

North Yorkshire Police is planning to expand training in dealing with incidents involving mental health issues to all front line staff. A randomly picked two hundred thirty officers attended a course to help improve identification of people with mental health needs.
The trial compared the group with officers yet to receive training and found the study team was more likely to record an incident as ‘mental health’. It is hoped similar training will be rolled out across UK police forces. The results of a survey suggested there was a positive change in police officers’ knowledge, attitudes and confidence in responding to incidents involving individuals with mental health problems. The College of Policing estimates that approximately fifteen to twenty percent of police time is spent on mental health related incidents in the UK.

In April, a watchdog warned police forces in England and Wales were increasingly being used as the “first resort” for dealing with people who have mental health issues. Deputy Chief Constable Lisa Winward, of North Yorkshire Police, said: “Clearly there remains much work to be done to support people with mental health problems and avoid the need to contact the police in the first place.

https://www.nhs.uk/news/food-and-diet/avoid-eating-just-your-bedtime-study-recommends/

“It’s not what you eat, it’s when you eat that matters: study shows timing your meals right is the key to beating obesity,” the Mail Online reports. The headline was prompted by a small US study involving one hundred ten university students.  Researchers gave them activity monitors to wear, measured their sleep patterns, and observed how much they ate and at what time. The researchers were particularly interested in what they termed dim-light melatonin onset or DLMO. DLMO is when the body begins to wind down in preparation for sleep and starts producing the sleep hormone melatonin. For most of us, our DLMO usually begins around eight PM. But the timing can vary if you do shift work. The researchers found students with a higher body weight tended to eat more of their calories later in the day, closer to their DLMO. This adds to previous evidence suggesting it’s good to consume more of our calories earlier in the day, when we have more opportunities to be active ahead of us. Eating large, heavy meals late in the evening has also been linked with higher body fat. But as a single study in a small, specific sample of students, this study provides little evidence that lifestyle and eating habits have a direct effect on body weight. As advice goes, it may be sensible to consider whether regularly eating a large, heavy meal close to bedtime is the best thing for your health and wellbeing. Eating earlier in the day may not make you magically thinner, but it may help prevent night-time indigestion.

This study observed the eating and activity patterns and body measurements of some university students across the course of a week. The study recruited one hundred ten university students aged eighteen to twenty two. They took part in a thirty-day sleep-wake monitoring study, where they were instructed to wear a wrist actigraph monitor at all times. The students also kept daily sleep and exercise diaries. Sleep timing and duration was assessed from the actigraph monitor and correlated with the diaries. For seven consecutive days in the middle of the course, participants were asked to record all the food and drink they consumed. Researchers assessed meals, calories consumed, and their timing against sleep, activity and body fat. The study gives a breakdown of the average calories consumed and their timings. Those with a calorie intake-midpoint later in the day were also more likely to consume a greater number of calories at this time. People eating more calories later in the day also tended to have less sleep. The best way to achieve and maintain a healthy weight is to eat a balanced diet high in fruit and vegetables and low in saturated fat and sugars, and to get regular exercise.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-09-people-disabilities-major-hurdles-accessing.html

According to research published in the online journal BMJ Open, people with disabilities in the UK face major hurdles accessing healthcare. Disabled women are particularly disadvantaged, the findings show. Around one in five people or nineteen percent in the UK is thought to live with a disability, but little is known about their access to healthcare services and what barriers they might face. In a bid to rectify this, the researchers analysed nearly thirteen thousand anonymised responses from the European Health Interview Survey (two thousand thirteen and two thousand fourteen) to assess use of services and any unmet healthcare need.

From among this sample, more than five thousand two hundred adults (aged sixteen and above) had disabilities, defined as a health problem which limited routine activities and had lasted for more than six months. Depending on the severity of their disability, they were classified as ‘mild’ or ‘severe.’ The remaining seven thousand five hundred people in the sample were classified as having no disability. The researchers then applied five different variables to assess unmet healthcare need over the previous twelve months. These were: long waiting list(s); distance or transport issues; cost of medical examination or treatment; cost of prescribed medicines; cost of mental health care. The analysis showed that those who were severely disabled made up the largest proportion of those with an unmet healthcare need. By far the biggest obstacle they faced was a long wait for treatment, which affected more than one in four living with a severe disability. A comparison of unmet healthcare needs in people with and without a disability, showed that those who were severely disabled were most likely to be affected, followed by those who were mildly disabled. The largest difference in unmet healthcare needs between the two groups was generated by the cost of mental health care: those with a mild or severe disability were between four point five and more than seven times as likely to face hurdles in accessing this as were those without a disability.

 

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.