The Health News USA July 17 2017

Overview

  • Many Americans are downright lazy. That’s among the findings of a study by Stanford University researchers using step-counters installed in most smartphones to track the walking activity of about 700,000 people in 46 countries around the world
  • Doctor Charalambos Antoniades of Britain’s University of Oxford and colleagues reported that they have developed a new imaging method that detects inflamed fat cells  as they are transforming into the inflamed, hardened plaques that clog up arteries. If the method holds up, doctors could start patients on drugs such as statins far earlier than they do now  in time to save them from ever developing serious heart disease, the researchers report in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
  • Eating fast food has been seen as a key factor in the growing obesity epidemic in the U.S. and throughout the world. Food journalist Mark Bittman says that the ‘fact’ that junk food is cheaper than real food has become a reflexive part of how we explain why so many Americans are overweight, particularly those with lower incomes. Poor people were actually less likely to eat fast food — and do so less frequently — than those in the middle class, and only a little more likely than the rich.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 17th of July 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

https:www.usatoday.comstorynewshealth20170712u-s-among-worlds-laziest-countries-and-its-making-us-fat471332001

Many Americans are downright lazy.  That’s among the findings of a study by Stanford University researchers using step-counters installed in most smartphones  to track the walking activity of about seven hundred thousand people in forty six countries around the world.  Scott Delp, a professor of bioengineering who co-led the research told the BBC the “study is one thousand times larger than any previous study on human movement.”  The least lazy, according to the study published in the journal Nature,   are the Chinese, particularly those in Hong Kong where people averaged six thousand eight hundred and eighty a steps a day.

The worst nation was nearby Indonesia where people walked nearly half as much,  averaging three thousand five hundred and thirteen steps a day.  The worldwide average is four thousand nine hundred and sixty one steps,  with Americans averaging four thousand seven hundred and seventy four.  Does that mean Indonesians are much more likely to be obese than Americans?  No, the researchers say. The key is the variation in the amount of walking.

Overweight kids are costing America billions.  Obesity, inactivity could outpace smoking in cancer death risk.  More than two billion are overweight or obese globally, new study says.

Tim Althoff, who worked on the study, pointed to Sweden, with an average of five thousand eight hundred and sixty three steps, as having one of the smallest activity inequality gaps.  “It also had one of the lowest rates of obesity,” he said.

Another factor in activity inequality involved where people live: high-density cities or more suburban settings.  Jennifer Hicks, another researcher in the study, told the Stanford news site that they examined three California cities located close to one another – San Francisco, San Jose and Fremont.  They found San Francisco held both the highest walkability score and the lowest level of activity inequality.  Hicks stated that in cities that are more walkable, everyone tends to take more daily steps, whether male or female, young or old, healthy weight or obese.

http:www.nbcnews.comhealthhealth-carenew-heart-imaging-method-may-predict-heart-attacks-n782271

Researchers say they’ve developed a better way of scanning someone’s heart to predict who is most at risk of a heart attack or stroke  — long before conventional imaging methods can do it.

By the time someone knows he or she has blocked arteries,  it’s too late to do much more than bypass surgery or putting in a stent to prop open the narrowed vessels.  Sometimes a heart attack or stroke is the very first symptom.  About seven hundred fifty thousand Americans have a heart attack every year.

Doctor Charalambos Antoniades of Britain’s University of Oxford and colleagues reported that they have developed a new imaging method that detects inflamed fat cells  as they are transforming into the inflamed, hardened plaques that clog up arteries.  He said that the new method also allows detection of those small but inflamed artherosclerotic plaques in our heart arteries  that are prone to rupture, therefore are about to cause a heart attack.

If the method holds up, doctors could start patients on drugs such as statins far earlier than they do now  in time to save them from ever developing serious heart disease,  the researchers report in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

They found a way to identify which layers of fat were inflamed and unstable by looking at the size and shape of the cells using computed tomography (CT) scans.’’We are now further validating our method in larger numbers of patients in large prospective clinical studies to document and confirm the predictive value of this method for future heart attacks,” Antoniades said.

http:edition.cnn.com20170712healthpoor-americans-fast-food-partnerindex.html

Eating fast food is frequently blamed for damaging our health.  As nutrition experts point out, it is not the healthiest type of meal since it is typically high in fat and salt.  More widely, it’s seen as a key factor in the growing obesity epidemic in the U.S. and throughout the world.  Because it’s considered relatively inexpensive, there’s an assumption that poor people eat more fast food than other socioeconomic groups  — which has convinced some local governments to try to limit their access.  Food journalist Mark Bittman says that the ‘fact’ that junk food is cheaper than real food  has become a reflexive part of how we explain why so many Americans are overweight, particularly those with lower incomes.  Our recently published research examined this assumption by looking at who eats fast food using a large sample of random Americans.  Poor people were actually less likely to eat fast food  — and do so less frequently — than those in the middle class,  and only a little more likely than the rich.  More and more restaurants list calories on their menus.

The typical cost per meal at a fast-food restaurant —  which the U.S. Census calls limited service — is over eight US dollars based on the average of all limited service places.  Fast food is cheap only in comparison to eating in a full-service restaurant,  with the average cost totals about fifteen dollars.

Moreover, eight dollars is a lot for a family living under the U.S. poverty line,  which for a family of two is a bit above sixteen thousand dollars or about forty four per day.  It is doubtful a poor family of two would be able to regularly spend more than a third of its daily income eating fast food.

It’s been discovered that people who said they checked ingredients before eating new foods had lower fast-food intake.  This suggests that making it easier for Americans to learn what is in their food could help sway consumers away from fast food and toward healthier eating options.

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