The Health News Australia October 12 2017

  • Osher Gunsberg is sharing details of his personal history to encourage others to share their stories to stop the isolation of living with mental illness. After going public with his mental health issues in 2016, Gunsberg credits listening to other people’s stories as an important part of his recovery process.
  • This World Mental Health Day, employers and employees alike are urged to rethink how they approach this issue in the workplace. One in five Australians aged 16 to 85 experience a mental illness in any given year, a survey from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveals. It affects a large number of people so cannot be ignored.
  • One of the most beautiful things about the human body is its resilience and its ability to adapt to physical demands like exercise training. Our bones, muscles, tendons, heart, and lungs, will adapt to the stress exposed to it. This means if you undertake exercise that’s physically challenging, your body will adapt to this stress to ensure the same activity feels slightly easier in the future.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 12th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-09/osher-gunsberg-world-mental-health-day/9019776

Osher Gunsberg is sharing details of his personal history to encourage others to share their stories to stop the isolation of living with mental illness. After going public with his mental health issues in two thousand sixteen, Gunsberg credits listening to other people’s stories as an important part of his recovery process. “One of the things about mental illness is that it can be very isolating and by sharing stories you actually get to realise that you’re not alone,” he said on a special series of the ABC Tall Tales and True podcast to mark World Mental Health Day on October ten.Gunsberg says people who openly share their stories are an important part of the education and awareness process. ….

As was reported in two thousand sixteen, Gunsberg says his mental health started to deteriorate while living in the United States in two thousand fourteen. After being off medication for nine months, a series of life and professional pressures culminated in Gunsberg having an episode that saw him staggering around the streets of Venice Beach convinced that the world was coming to an end.

Since outing himself in two thousand sixteen, Gunsberg has since become a board member of SANE Australia. Gunsberg urges anyone with any concerns, either their own or someone close to them, to take the first step and seek help. He added: “You just have to pick up the phone, it’s that simple. Help is at hand. And by seeking help for yourself or someone else, you can get on the right path to recovery.”

http://www.news.com.au/finance/work/careers/world-mental-health-day-how-to-address-wellbeing-in-the-workplace/news-story/bee7cdfbccb030a54d6074723eb422bf

This World Mental Health Day, employers and employees alike are urged to rethink how they approach this issue in the workplace. For employers, it’s about leading by example, ensuring employees are comfortable having open conversation and offering help to those who need it.
For employees, it’s about finding an employer with good mental health policy, supportive colleagues and looking after themselves to avoid issues such as burnout or stress, which can contribute to mental illness. One in five Australians aged sixteen to eighty five experience a mental illness in any given year, a survey from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveals.
It affects a large number of people so cannot be ignored. Nicole Dwyer, chief executive of employment services provider Workskil Australia, says her organisation is increasingly assisting people with mental health illness. The organisation’s Disability Employment Services team works closely with jobseekers and employers to ensure the right support mechanisms are in place.

Dwyer says unemployment and financial worries can lead to anxiety and depression among some job seekers, while mounting workload pressure can be a major form of stress for those in work.

Commercial construction company BADGE has an Employee Assistance Program that allows any employee or a member of their family to have twenty four-seven access to free and confidential sessions with a professional counsellor. Group business manager Nick Abley says BADGE strives to create a workplace that’s inclusive and supportive of all its employees.

Flexible working arrangements are also available for employees that require support.
BADGE employs about two hundred forty people across Adelaide, Brisbane, Maroochydore and Perth and is currently recruiting

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-10-06/do-we-lose-exercise-gains-as-our-bodies-get-used-to-it/9022858

One of the most beautiful things about the human body is its resilience and its ability to adapt to physical demands like exercise training. Our bones, muscles, tendons, heart, and lungs, will adapt to the stress exposed to it. This means if you undertake exercise that’s physically challenging, your body will adapt to this stress to ensure the same activity feels slightly easier in the future. This mechanism of adaptation is both a blessing and a curse. The adage “if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it” can be applied here. If we keep on with the same exercise regime, we’ll maintain the current gains in fitness, but further gains will diminish and we’ll eventually reach a plateau. These adaptive responses are called the “training effect”. The training effect can only occur when adequate stimulus or exercise stress is applied to the body, and sufficient recovery is allowed. Muscle is a great example. Many adaptations occur, but from a mechanical perspective, small micro-tears in the muscle are experienced when you lift a heavier weight than you normally would. Immediately after training, your body gets to work to heal the “damage” and rebuilds the muscle so it’s strong enough to more easily cope with those demands in the future. Progressively increasing load and adding variation are two important progression strategies to help ensure fitness gains are realised. Progressive overload refers to frequent yet small increases in stress. While exercise is one of the best things for your mind and body, there are certain health conditions that can make being active more risky. Your endurance performance can be influenced by the amount of time you spend completing your desired activity.
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Be mindful that sleep, good nutrition, flexibility, and recovery days are just as important for progressing your fitness as the most challenging session you do in the gym or on the road this week.

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