The Health News Australia March 23 2018

  • Health authorities have warned that Australians are risking their lives by getting cheap and illegal cosmetic procedures at dodgy beauty salons and back-alley clinics.  The ABC has obtained footage of several recent raids conducted by the NSW Health Department, in which officials seized hundreds of contraband drugs and treatments from law-breaking operations. Some of the items seized included non-approved dermal fillers, topical anaesthetics, human placenta extract and medical-strength facial peels made in China and Japan.
  • Simple strategies could help families of teenagers with a developmental disability gain confidence about their teen’s future. University of Queensland Associate Professor Kate Sofronoff said many parents of teens with a developmental disability faced enormous challenges, particularly concerning behaviour. The group program, Building Bridges Triple P, is free and will be run at the UQ Psychology Clinic in St. Lucia every weekend from Saturday April fourteen. It will run over 8 consecutive weeks with 5 weekly 90 to 120 minute face-to-face sessions, and three sessions conducted over the phone to help keep families on track with the strategies.
  • New findings by the National Heart Foundation show many of us find it a difficult topic to discuss, especially for heart attack survivors. In fact, fewer than 1 in 4 Australian health professionals spoke to heart attack survivors about sex, although 8 in 10 believe it’s important to have the conversation. Heart Foundation Queensland health director Rachelle Foreman said resuming sexual activity and, just as importantly, emotional intimacy are important for quality of life for patients and their partners.

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 23rd of March 2018. Read by Tabetha Moreto.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-22/black-market-cosmetic-drugs-used-on-australian-patients/9570826

Health authorities have warned that Australians are risking their lives by getting cheap and illegal cosmetic procedures at dodgy beauty salons and back-alley clinics.  The ABC has obtained footage of several recent raids conducted by the New South Wales Health Department, in which officials seized hundreds of contraband drugs and treatments from law-breaking operations. Some of the items seized included non-approved dermal fillers, topical anaesthetics, human placenta extract and medical-strength facial peels made in China and Japan. New South Wales Health Minister Brad Hazzard said the products were not registered for use in Australia and could be contaminated.
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New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria have cracked down on cosmetic surgery providers in recent years after several patients suffered life-threatening complications. However, authorities believe back-alley clinics pose a far greater threat to patient safety. Doctor Cath Porter from the Cosmetic Physicians College of Australasia said many people wrongly believed cosmetic injections were low risk.
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Several cosmetic surgeons told the ABC they had had increasing numbers of patients come to them for help after botched operations at secret, unlicensed facilities. The doctors were too scared to go on the record because they feared reprisals from illegal providers.
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Many patients are reluctant to report problems to health authorities, and those who do come forward are often too late.
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In August two thousand seventeen, Sydney beauty clinic owner Jean Huang died after a botched breast procedure carried out by a Chinese nurse in Australia on a tourist visa. The cause of her death is still being investigated, but a toxicology report tendered at court found large quantities of the painkiller tramadol in her system.

http://health.uq.edu.au/article/2018/03/supporting-teens-developmental-disabilities

Simple strategies could help families of teenagers with a developmental disability gain confidence about their teen’s future. University of Queensland Associate Professor Kate Sofronoff said many parents of teens with a developmental disability faced enormous challenges, particularly concerning behaviour.

Doctor Sofronoff said: “For these families, behavioural problems can seem all-consuming and can affect the whole family. Life can be so stressful, many parents or carers worry about their child’s outlook and how they will be able to function as a member of the community as they grow into adulthood. What we are exploring is whether simple strategies delivered over an eight-week group program can give parents more confidence to manage their teen’s behaviour and encourage their teen’s independence and resilience.”
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The group program, Building Bridges Triple P, is free and will be run at the UQ Psychology Clinic in Saint Lucia every weekend from Saturday April fourteen. It will run over eight consecutive weeks with five weekly ninety to one hundred twenty minute face-to-face sessions, and three sessions conducted over the phone to help keep families on track with the strategies.

https://www.thesenior.com.au/health/who-says-sex-has-to-stop

New findings by the National Heart Foundation show many of us find it a difficult topic to discuss, especially for heart attack survivors. In fact, fewer than one in four Australian health professionals spoke to heart attack survivors about sex, although eight in ten believe it’s important to have the conversation. Heart Foundation Queensland health director Rachelle Foreman said resuming sexual activity and, just as importantly, emotional intimacy are important for quality of life for patients and their partners.
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Miss Foreman said: “Depression, fatigue, a lack of cardiac fitness, pain or discomfort and sexual dysfunction, including low libido, can also play a role. Two out of three heart attack survivors say that having a heart attack had affected their sexual activity, yet only one in four had spoken with a health professional about it.”
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Foundation chief medical advisor Garry Jennings urged patients to talk to their doctors.
Professor Jennings said: “If it’s not covered by health professionals during recovery, it can play on patients’ minds and cause misconceptions and unnecessary anxiety.”
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He said it is often partners who were worried about sex after a heart attack for fear of hurting the person recovering. “It is reasonable to have sex as early as one week after a cardiac event such as a heart attack or angiogram/stent insertion, and six to eight weeks after coronary bypass surgery, when the wound has completely healed.” As with any physical activity, it is important to feel comfortable and to progressively increase your level of participation.

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