The Health News United Kingdom October 5 2017

  • The NHS announced earlier this year it plans to close College Yard surgery in Mount Street. Highnam Surgery, which is part of the same practice as College Yard, would remain open and would team up with Cheltenham Road surgery in Gloucester. But concerns have been voiced about the impact that Highnam Surgery’s possible closure would have on its elderly patients who would have to travel further to see their doctor.
  • More than half of NHS nurses say patient safety is being compromised due to severe staff shortages. A new survey by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) asked its members in all four UK countries about staffing levels on their most recent shift and the quality of care provided.
  • The Legatum Institute, a London-based research institute released its tenth annual global Prosperity Index in November, a huge survey that ranks the most prosperous countries in the world. One of the big components of the ranking is how healthy a country’s people are. Health is measured by three key components: a country’s basic mental and physical health, health infrastructure, and the availability of preventative care.  The top 5 countries out of 16 are Luxembourg, Singapore, Switzerland, Japan & Netherlands

News on Health Professional Radio. Today is the 5th of  October 2017. Read by Tabetha Moreto. Health News

http://www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk/news/health/plan-close-gloucester-surgery-could-552545

The NHS announced earlier this year it plans to close College Yard surgery in Mount Street.
Highnam Surgery, which is part of the same practice as College Yard, would remain open and would team up with Cheltenham Road surgery in Gloucester. These plans will be discussed by Gloucestershire’s Clinical Commissioning Group next month and if they’re approved College Yard would most likely close within three years. But concerns have been voiced about the impact that Highnam Surgery’s possible closure would have on its elderly patients who would have to travel further to see their doctor. Sharon Bowden has written to Gloucestershire Live on behalf of her elderly parents at retirement complex Castlemeads Court about her concerns on the impact of College Yard’s possible closure. She wrote: “This particular neighbourhood has a very high proportion of elderly and disabled residents, who will be disproportionally disadvantaged by this proposed change.
….
Missis Bowden said coming back from Cheltenham Road Surgery there would be a long walk to the second bus stop which would mean her parents would have to get a taxi back – which would be about twenty percent of her mother’s state pension. Health chiefs believe the move would offer more secure staffing levels for the longer term and enable the practice team to use resources more flexibly to meet patient needs. Currently one GP works between the College Yard and Cheltenham Road surgeries, and the NHS says it would “not be practical” to manage staff across three sites.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/health/more-half-nurses-say-patient-13692892

More than half of NHS nurses say patient safety is being compromised due to severe staff shortages. A new survey by the Royal College of Nursing asked its members in all four UK countries about staffing levels on their most recent shift and the quality of care provided.
Some fifty five percent said shifts did not have the level of nurses planned, with fifty three percent stating the shortage was impacting on the care given to patients. More than a third or  thirty six percent report having to leave elements of patient care undone due to a lack of time, while two-thirds or sixty five percent work an unpaid extra hour on average. In Wales, the Chief Nursing Officer’s guidance recommends a ratio of one registered nurse to seven patients on both medical and surgical wards. Secondary reference is made to a ratio of  one is to eleven at night.

But the survey found an average of nine point seven patients to one registered nurse on day shifts in Wales – and an average of fifteen point seven patients to one registered nurse on night shifts. Wales introduced the Nurse Staffing Levels (Wales) Act in two thousand sixteen, and following a period of consultation the implementation guidance is due later this year.
The Welsh Government has committed to extending the legislation to further settings.

Tina Donnelly, director of the Royal College of Nursing in Wales, said: “The results of this report are really devastating for nurses seeking to provide maximum standards of care across the UK.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/16-countries-best-healthcare-world-a7976626.html

The Legatum Institute, a London-based research institute released its tenth annual global Prosperity Index in November, a huge survey that ranks the most prosperous countries in the world. The organisation compares  one hundred four variables to come up with its list, splitting those variables into nine subindexes. One of the big components of the ranking is how healthy a country’s people are. Health is measured by three key components: a country’s basic mental and physical health, health infrastructure, and the availability of preventative care. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the countries that have the best scores in the Prosperity Index, and therefore rank as the world’s healthiest, are generally big, developed economies with large amounts of resources. Britain — whose NHS pioneered free at the point of use healthcare globally — misses out on this list, finishing twentieth in the Legatum Institute’s health sub-index.

These are the top sixteen countries: Sixteen- Canada; Fifteen- Qatar; Fourteen- France; Thirteen- Norway; Twelve- New Zealand; Eleven- Belgium; Ten- Germany;  Nine- Israel; Eight- Australia; Seven- Hong Kong; Six- Sweden; Five- Netherlands:  In two thousand fifteen the country gained the number one spot at the top of the annual Euro health consumer index; Four- Japan:   The country’s life expectancy — eighty three point seven — is the highest on the planet; Three- Switzerland — Rich, beautiful, and incredibly healthy. Switzerland has pretty much all anyone could want from a country. Its healthcare service is universal and is based upon the mandatory holding of health insurance by all citizens; Two- Singapore: Singapore’s five point six million citizens have an average life expectancy of eighty three point one years old; One- Luxembourg — The country’s average life expectancy is eighty two.

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